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Tlostanova, Madina, Professor, PhD
Biography [swe]

I focus on postcolonial studies, decolonial thought, non-Western feminisms, the postsocialist human condition. 

Publications (10 of 47) Show all publications
Tlostanova, M. (2023). Can methodologies be decolonial?: Towards a relational experiential epistemic togetherness (1ed.). In: Nina Lykke, Redi Koobak, Petra Bakos, Swati Arora, Kharnita Mohamed (Ed.), Pluriversal Conversations on Transnational Feminisms: And Words Collide from a Place (pp. 125-138). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can methodologies be decolonial?: Towards a relational experiential epistemic togetherness
2023 (English)In: Pluriversal Conversations on Transnational Feminisms: And Words Collide from a Place / [ed] Nina Lykke, Redi Koobak, Petra Bakos, Swati Arora, Kharnita Mohamed, London: Routledge, 2023, 1, p. 125-138Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2023 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Advances in Feminist Studies and Intersectionality
Keywords
transnational feminism, gender studies
National Category
Other Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-199305 (URN)9781032457994 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-11-25 Created: 2023-11-25 Last updated: 2024-01-23Bibliographically approved
Tlostanova, M. (2023). Decoloniality: between a travelling concept and a relational onto-epistemic political stance (1ed.). In: Julia Suarez Krabbe, Adrian Groglopo (Ed.), Coloniality and Decolonisation in the Nordic Region: (pp. 145-163). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decoloniality: between a travelling concept and a relational onto-epistemic political stance
2023 (English)In: Coloniality and Decolonisation in the Nordic Region / [ed] Julia Suarez Krabbe, Adrian Groglopo, London: Routledge, 2023, 1, p. 145-163Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A central concept of decolonial thought, “coloniality,” was coined by A. Quijano at an uneasy moment of the collapse of state socialism and discrediting of its utopia, and the arrival of neoliberal globalisation as the only legitimate narrative. Decoloniality is a reflection of disillusionment and a subsequent transference of decolonisation rhetoric from embodied anticolonial political struggles to the spheres of knowledge production and aesthesis. This meant at once a deeper critical delve into the modern/colonial mechanisms of the production of knowledge and subjectivities, but also a potential danger of depoliticisation. Whitewashed and sanitised “decolonial studies” or “decolonial theory” that fail to see the profound differences between postcolonial theory and decoloniality and often substitute decoloniality for deconstruction, yet keep the Euromodern epistemic framework intact, is what we find today in European and especially Nordic contexts. They are often marked by a blindness towards their own specific colonial trajectories and especially the imperial difference, and the struggles of indigenous peoples. A thorough decolonial revisiting of the Nordic colonial trajectories including the early suspended expansionist projects and specific forms of settler colonialism, could help enrich decolonial thought with additional critical optic and bring it more in tune with the current global challenges. These challenges go beyond the original decolonial focus on the intersection of race and capitalism incorporating the climate change, chronophobia, defuturing, and global unsettlement. They also urge decoloniality to move in the direction of relational agency unlimited to colonial difference alone and avoiding both the extreme of imagined indigeneity and a confinement to the ivory academic tower. Taking these nuances into account could help us come closer to an understanding of decolonial potentials in the future and its applicability in other places such as Nordic Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2023 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-192097 (URN)10.4324/9781003293323-9 (DOI)9781032274867 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-03-01 Created: 2023-03-01 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Tlostanova, M. (2023). Narratives of unsettlement: being out-of-joint as a generative human condition (1ed.). New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narratives of unsettlement: being out-of-joint as a generative human condition
2023 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This book uses an interdisciplinary inter-mediational approach to reflect on the relational complexity of unsettlement as a predominant sensibility of the present époque.

The book tackles interrelated aspects of unsettlement including temporality, the disconcerting effects of the Anthropocene, the biomedical facets of unsettlement, and the post-pandemic futures. It uses a chimeric approach combining essayistic and speculative fiction writing methods, negotiating rational, affective and imaginative ways of inquiry, and showing rather than merely explaining. The book poses questions, but gives no ready-made answers, and invites us to think together on the unsettlement as a negatively global human condition that can be collectively made into a generative move of resurgence and refuturing.

Contributing to critical reflections on the main features and sensibilities of the current époque, the book will be of interest to scholars and undergraduate and graduate students, as well as the general public, interested in critical global and future perspectives, in decolonial research, gender studies, and posthumanities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2023. p. 224 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Advances in Feminist Studies and Intersectionality
Keywords
unsettlement, temporality, migration, immunity, writing as a method of inquiry, Emotions, Discomfort (Psychology), Social change, Känslor, Social förändring
National Category
Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-192104 (URN)10.4324/9781003344964 (DOI)9781003344964 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-03-02 Created: 2023-03-02 Last updated: 2023-04-11Bibliographically approved
Vlachou, M. & Tlostanova, M. (2023). The geopolitics of international higher education prior and during Covid-19: A decolonial feminist analysis. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 21(2), 204-221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The geopolitics of international higher education prior and during Covid-19: A decolonial feminist analysis
2023 (English)In: Globalisation, Societies and Education, ISSN 1476-7724, E-ISSN 1476-7732, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 204-221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Thinking with four non-EU academic migrants from the global South, andtheir experiences of working/studying or starting to work/study duringthe Covid-19 pandemic, we are unravelling the current geopolitics ofthe internationalised higher education in the global North. Our centralargument is that Covid-19 has not simply affected the national andglobal politics of migration, including international academic migration,but it has also worked as a magnifying glass of the historicallyestablished inequalities sustained and perpetuated by physical,biomedical and epistemic borders. Most importantly, we are notfollowing the rather obvious theoretical route of biopolitics whileanalysing the internationalisation of higher education in relation to theCovid-19 health crisis and migration politics. Instead, we are looking atthis geo-biopolitical and epistemic assemblage through a decoloniallens. In doing so, we want to contribute with our and our interviewees’reflections to the ongoing discussion on what currently counts as‘internationalisation’ in higher education, pointing out the colononialand neoliberal foundations of it, and the possibilities of aligning it withthe efforts of decolonising the university.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge; Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Academic migrants; coloniality of time; geopolitics; international higher education; Covid-19; decolonising HE
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-189008 (URN)10.1080/14767724.2022.2127406 (DOI)000864750200001 ()
Available from: 2022-10-07 Created: 2022-10-07 Last updated: 2023-11-21Bibliographically approved
Kawesa, V., Knobblock, I., Vlachou, M., Koobak, R., Mehrabi, T., Tlostanova, M. & Lykke, N. (2023). The magic of feminist bridging: A mosaic of anti-racist speech bubblesabout Othering in Swedish Academia. Kvinder, Køn og Forskning, 2, 146-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The magic of feminist bridging: A mosaic of anti-racist speech bubblesabout Othering in Swedish Academia
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Kvinder, Køn og Forskning, ISSN 0907-6182, E-ISSN 2245-6937, Vol. 2, p. 146-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Are feminist coalitions magical enough to survive and endure while questioning and shaking the colonial/racist foundations of Swedish academic knowledge production and the overall Swedish society? Can feminist bridging and collective writing remain a magical process even when grappling with difficult experiences and memories of othering and racialisation? This is a creatively and collectively written article on feminist coalition building, and its importance in thinking, articulating and deconstructing race, racialization and racist structures. More than two years ago, seven interdisciplinary gender studies scholars of mixed ethnic and racial origins, came together to explore our differently situated experiences of disidentifying with Swedish academia and society in a collective we call Loving Coalitions. Against the background of Swedish exceptionalism, historical amnesia of Sweden’s colonial past and present, and the deafening silence on Swedish whiteness and racism, we are sharing our poems, letters, texts and testimonies of racist interactions in Swedish academia and society. While doing so, we discuss how moving away from conventional ways of doing research and experimenting with creative methodological alternatives, such as automatic writing, epistolary formats, poems, fiction, collective memory-work, allow us to acknowledge and embrace our different life backgrounds and academic trajectories as a mode of knowledge production. We hope and believe that our experiences, refl ections and ways to resist racism and Othering in Sweden and Swedish academia through alternative coalition building, based on mutual care and love, can be relevant in a Danish context as well.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: , 2023
Keywords
feminist coalitions, Swedish exceptionalism, racism, Swedish academia, alternative methodologies, everyday experiences, Critical Whiteness Studies, Critical Race studies, decoloniality
National Category
Other Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-199307 (URN)
Available from: 2023-11-25 Created: 2023-11-25 Last updated: 2023-12-01Bibliographically approved
Tlostanova, M. (2022). Discordant trajectories of the (post-)Soviet (post)colonial aesthetics. Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, 24(7), 995-1010
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discordant trajectories of the (post-)Soviet (post)colonial aesthetics
2022 (English)In: Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, ISSN 1369-801X, E-ISSN 1469-929X, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 995-1010Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

After a short critical reflection on what is understood under anticolonial aesthetics and how it relates to the shift from political decolonization to a more epistemologically and aesthetically oriented decoloniality, the essay focuses on the seldom considered anticolonial and decolonial trajectories originating in the ex- and present colonies of the Russian/Soviet empire and post/neo-imperial Russia. It is analysed how these trajectories intersect with and diverge from the predominantly Anglophone and Francophone postcolonial conceptual and theoretical frames and what role is played in this configuration by the state socialist form of coloniality. Its most negative effects consist in recolonization presented as decolonization and the interrupted genealogies of anticolonial resistance and re-existence. As a result, each new generation has to start from scratch, while anticolonial thinkers and artists become enchanted by western (neo)liberalism presented as the only viable alternative to Russian and local authoritarian regimes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge; Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
anticolonial aesthetics, decoloniality, postcolonial condition, Soviet coloniality
National Category
Specific Literatures Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-184286 (URN)10.1080/1369801X.2022.2054003 (DOI)000780884300001 ()
Available from: 2022-04-11 Created: 2022-04-11 Last updated: 2023-04-04Bibliographically approved
Tlostanova, M. (2022). Деколониальные гендерные эпистемологии (seconded.). Nalchik: Print Center (second edition, 2022), Maska (first edition, 2009)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Деколониальные гендерные эпистемологии
2022 (Russian)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The book conceptualizes a number of gender epistemic models, connected with decolonial philosophy, traces their similarities with and differences from the western feminist theories, gender discourses of the third world and diasporic feminists of color.  The book offers a short genealogy of gender discourses, identities and activism in two colonial spaces of Russia/USSR — Central Asia and the Caucasus, critically linking them with decolonial feminism and suggesting the ways and possibilities for their development in the future as a basis for the emancipation of the mind and knowledge from the gnoseological and ontological limitations of modernity and its darker side — coloniality, and building the trajectories of resistance and re-existence as well as transcultural and trans-value global dialogue on the level of the political society. 

Abstract [ru]

В книге анализируется становление ряда моделей гендерной эпистемологии, связанныхс философией деколониального поворота, прослеживаются их точки соприкосновенияи отталкивания от западных феминистских теорий, гендерных дискурсов третьего мираи цветного диаспорного феминизма. Исследование вводит в отечественный научныйконтекст новые имена и теоретические модели, уже успевшие занять значимое место вмировом транс-культурном и транс-эпистемологическом феминистском диалоге, но поканеизвестные в России. Книга представляет краткую генеалогию гендерных дискурсов,идентичностей и активизма двух колониальных пространств России/СССР —Центральной Азии и Кавказа, критически соотнося их с деколониальным феминизмоми представляя пути и возможности их развития в будущем как основы освобождения(со)знания от гносеологических и онтологических ограничений западной модерностис ее темной стороной — колониальностью и выстраивания траекторий противостоянияи ре-экзистенции, а также транс-культурного и транс-ценностного глобального диалогана уровне политического общества. Книга рассчитана на преподавателей ВУЗов,аспирантов, студентов, интересующихся гендерной проблематикой, культурной ифилософской антропологией, эпистемологией и социальной философией, особеннонезападного мира.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nalchik: Print Center (second edition, 2022), Maska (first edition, 2009), 2022. p. 384 Edition: second
Keywords
decolonial feminism, gender epistemology, the Caucasus, Central Asia
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-187917 (URN)9785911463502 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-08-29 Created: 2022-08-29 Last updated: 2023-10-30Bibliographically approved
Menon, N., Thapar-Björkert, S. & Tlostanova, M. (2021). Anti-colonial struggles, postcolonial subversions: an interview with Nivedita Menon. In: Redi Koobak, Madina Tlostanova, Suruchi Thapar-Björkert (Ed.), Postcolonial and postsocialist dialogues: intersections, opacites, challenges in feminist theorizing and practice (pp. 109-120). London: Routledge, Sidorna 109-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-colonial struggles, postcolonial subversions: an interview with Nivedita Menon
2021 (English)In: Postcolonial and postsocialist dialogues: intersections, opacites, challenges in feminist theorizing and practice / [ed] Redi Koobak, Madina Tlostanova, Suruchi Thapar-Björkert, London: Routledge, 2021, Vol. Sidorna 109-120, p. 109-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This interview centres around three themes: a) anti-colonial and nationalist convergences and disjunctures; b) the tensions between feminism and nationalism and inherent contradictions within Indian feminism and c) knowledge economies. Despite the mass presence of women in every kind of anti-imperialist resistance, feminist issues were not visible in the mainstream nationalist agenda, even well after independence in India. Over successive years, all homogenizing and patriarchal moves that accompany mainstream nationalism were subject to intense debate and scrutiny. In fact, this co-optation of feminist goals in nationalist neo-liberal agendas is a feature shared with many postsocialist economies. Menon critiques the concept of intersectionality which congeals into non-recognition multiple axes of identity, seeing race as the primary oppression. This has been a vexed issue for Dalit feminism(s). Finally, in relation to knowledge production, Menon identifies the production and distribution of knowledge as one still dominated by American and Western European academy, which potentially cripples dialogues between postsocialist and postcolonial scholars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2021
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-175008 (URN)9781003003199 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-04-15 Created: 2021-04-15 Last updated: 2021-04-15Bibliographically approved
Tlostanova, M. (2021). Beyond conservatism and radicalism: a decolonial glimpse into the post-truth world (1ed.). In: Edwin Etieyibo, Obvious Katsaura, Muchaparara Musemwa (Ed.), Africa's radicalisms and Conservatisms: Volume 1. Politics, poverty, marginalization and education (pp. 11-30). Leiden and Boston: Brill Academic Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond conservatism and radicalism: a decolonial glimpse into the post-truth world
2021 (English)In: Africa's radicalisms and Conservatisms: Volume 1. Politics, poverty, marginalization and education / [ed] Edwin Etieyibo, Obvious Katsaura, Muchaparara Musemwa, Leiden and Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2021, 1, p. 11-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Decolonial critique of modernity/coloniality emerged at the end of the Cold war when the happy image of globalization was launched as the only option left for the humanity. Decolonial thought instead came up with the idea of decoloniality as an alternative possible world with a specific epistemology, ethics and politics. This decolonial model has gradually become attractive worldwide against the failure of the positive phase of neoliberal globalization epitomized in the Covid-19 crisis. The binaries of conservatism and radicalism as well as right and left, democracy and authoritarianism, nationalism and cosmopolitanism are outdated products of the previous model of knowledge unable to describe the present social and political reality in which conservatism easily becomes radical and calling for change, whereas yesterday’s radicals turn into supporters of status-quo who are nostalgic of the past. The present shift from neoliberal globalism to right-wing nationalism and populism essentially leaves the global coloniality intact and multiplies the number of the new dispensable defutured lives - human and other. It also adds additional angles of discrimination and dehumanization such as technological coloniality. Possible venues for decolonial re-existence are linked with relationality, refusal to compete for a better place in modernity or a tag of a victim, and working for “deep coalitions”, thus attempting to give the world back its future dimension.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden and Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2021 Edition: 1
Series
Annals of the International Institute of Sociology ; 14
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-172786 (URN)10.1163/9789004445079_002 (DOI)9789004444690 (ISBN)9789004445079 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-01-22 Created: 2021-01-22 Last updated: 2021-08-24Bibliographically approved
Zhigunova, L. & Tlostanova, M. (2021). Circassian trajectories between post-Soviet neocolonialism, indigeneity, and diasporic dispersions: a conversation (1ed.). In: Redi Koobak, Madina Tlostanova, Suruchi Thapar-Björkert (Ed.), Postcolonical and postsocialist dialogues: intersections, opacities, challenges in feminist theorizing and practice (pp. 69-89). London: Routledge, Sidorna 69-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circassian trajectories between post-Soviet neocolonialism, indigeneity, and diasporic dispersions: a conversation
2021 (English)In: Postcolonical and postsocialist dialogues: intersections, opacities, challenges in feminist theorizing and practice / [ed] Redi Koobak, Madina Tlostanova, Suruchi Thapar-Björkert, London: Routledge, 2021, 1, Vol. Sidorna 69-89, p. 69-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Russian imperial and Soviet legacies still haunt many nations, and in many places elements of the Soviet and even Tsarist legacy are live political issues. This chapter provides an insight into the Circassian case that clearly demonstrates how the colonial history has been transformed into a neocolonial present. It discusses how Circassians, the indigenous people of the Northwestern Caucasus, are still reliving all sorts of trauma associated with Russian/Soviet imperialism and attempt to deconstruct the colonial discourse that marginalized or completely silenced them by falsifying or denying them their history and identity. Only in the post-Soviet period, Circassians started the process of reconnecting, remembering, reimagining, and reconceptualizing their identities. But, the struggle for historical truth in the North Caucasus is still ongoing and manifests itself in a clash between the official Soviet/Russian version of history that stubbornly insists on the old imperialist myths and the “counter memory” of Circassians who started to actively object to the ideologically motivated falsifications of their history. The subversive counter-discourse that undermines the imperial legacy is most strongly pronounced in literature and art of contemporary Circassian women-writers, artists, and activists.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2021 Edition: 1
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-175010 (URN)9781003003199 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-04-15 Created: 2021-04-15 Last updated: 2021-04-15Bibliographically approved
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