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Steglich, Christian, DrORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9097-0873
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Gremmen, M., Berger, C., Ryan, A., Steglich, C., Veenstra, R. & Dijkstra, J. K. (2019). Adolescents’ Friendships, Academic Achievement, and Risk Behaviors: Same-Behavior and Cross-Behavior Selection and Influence Processes. Child Development, 90(2), E192-E211
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents’ Friendships, Academic Achievement, and Risk Behaviors: Same-Behavior and Cross-Behavior Selection and Influence Processes
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2019 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 90, no 2, p. E192-E211Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined to what extent adolescents’ and their friends’ risk behaviors (i.e., delinquency and alcohol use) hinder or promote their academic achievement (grade point average [GPA]), and vice versa. Longitudinal data were used (N = 1,219 seventh- to ninth-grade adolescents; Mage = 13.69). Results showed that risk behaviors negatively affected adolescents’ GPA, whereas GPA protected against engaging in risk behaviors. Moreover, adolescents tended to select friends who have similar behaviors and friends’ behaviors became more similar over time (same-behavior selection and influence). Furthermore, although same-behavior effects seemed to dominate, evidence was found for some cross-behavior selection effects and a tendency in seventh grade for cross-behavior influence effects. Concluding, it is important to investigate the interplay between different behaviors with longitudinal social network analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147687 (URN)10.1111/cdev.13045 (DOI)000460664900002 ()29450883 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Dutch Scientific Organization (NWO) Program Council for Fundamental Scientific Education Research (PROO) [411-12-027]

Available from: 2018-05-05 Created: 2018-05-05 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
van der Ploeg, R., Steglich, C. & Veenstra, R. (2019). The way bullying works: How new ties facilitate the mutual reinforcement of status and bullying in elementary schools. Social Networks
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The way bullying works: How new ties facilitate the mutual reinforcement of status and bullying in elementary schools
2019 (English)In: Social Networks, ISSN 0378-8733, E-ISSN 1879-2111Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study addresses the puzzle how high-status bullies in elementary school are able to maintain high status among their classmates despite bullying (some of) them. The dynamic interplay between bullying and status was studied, focusing on how relational bullying affects the creation, dissolution, and maintenance of status attributions, and vice versa. Longitudinal round-robin peer nomination data were obtained from 82 school classes in15 Dutch elementary schools (2055 students; 50% boys) followed over three yearly measurements, starting out in grades 2–5 when students were aged 8-11. An age-dependent effect of bullying on the creation of new status attributions was found. Whereas the youngest group punished bullying by a refusal to attribute status to the bully, this turned into a reward of bullying in the oldest groups. Unexpectedly, high-status bullies seemed to avoid continual bullying of the same victims, pointing to explanations of why their status can persist.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Bullying, Peer status, Creation and maintenance of ties
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154080 (URN)10.1016/j.socnet.2018.12.006 (DOI)2-s2.0-85059678670 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Stadtfeld, C., Snijders, T., Steglich, C. & van Duijn, M. (2018). Statistical Power in Longitudinal Network Studies. Sociological Methods & Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Statistical Power in Longitudinal Network Studies
2018 (English)In: Sociological Methods & Research, ISSN 0049-1241, E-ISSN 1552-8294Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Longitudinal social network studies can easily suffer from insufficient statistical power. Studies that simultaneously investigate change of network ties and change of nodal attributes (selection and influence studies) are particularly at risk because the number of nodal observations is typically much lower than the number of observed tie variables. This article presents a simulation-based procedure to evaluate statistical power of longitudinal social network studies in which stochastic actor-oriented models are to be applied. Two detailed case studies illustrate how statistical power is strongly affected by network size, number of data collection waves, effect sizes, missing data, and participant turnover. These issues should thus be explored in the design phase of longitudinal social network studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
statistical power, selection and influence, missing data, research design, stochastic actor-oriented models, SIENA, network simulation, social network analysis
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147686 (URN)10.1177/0049124118769113 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-05-05 Created: 2018-05-05 Last updated: 2018-05-09Bibliographically approved
Franken, A., Prinstein, M., Dijkstra, J. K., Steglich, C., Harakeh, Z. & Vollebergh, W. (2016). Early Adolescent Friendship Selection Based on Externalizing Behavior: the Moderating Role of Pubertal Development. The SNARE Study. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 44, 1647-1657
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Adolescent Friendship Selection Based on Externalizing Behavior: the Moderating Role of Pubertal Development. The SNARE Study
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 44, p. 1647-1657Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined friendship (de-)selection processes in early adolescence. Pubertal development was examined as a potential moderator. It was expected that pubertal development would be associated with an increased tendency for adolescents to select their friends based on their similarities in externalizing behavior engagement (i.e., delinquency, alcohol use, and tobacco use). Data were used from the first three waves of the SNARE (Social Network Analysis of Risk behaviorin Early adolescence) study (N= 1144; 50 % boys;Mage=12.7; SD= 0.47), including students who entered the first year of secondary school. The hypothesis was tested using Stochastic Actor-Based Modeling in SIENA. While taking the network structure into account, and controlling for peer influence effects, the results supported this hypothesis. Early adolescents with higher pubertal development were as likely as their peers to select friends based on similarity in externalizing behavior and especially likely to remain friends with peers who had a similar level of externalizing behavior, andthus break friendship ties with dissimilar friends in this respect. As early adolescents are actively engaged in reorganizing their social context, adolescents with a higher pubertal development are especially likely to lose friendships with peers who do not engage in externalizing behavior, thus losing an important source of adaptive social control (i.e.,friends who do not engage in externalizing behavior).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2016
Keywords
Alcohol use, Delinquency, Pubertal development, Social network analysis, SIENA, Tobacco use
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142559 (URN)10.1007/s10802-016-0134-z (DOI)000386116700016 ()26897629 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84958754696 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Labun, A., Wittek, R. & Steglich, C. (2016). The Co-evolution of Power and Friendship Networks in an Organization. Network Science, 4(3), 364-384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Co-evolution of Power and Friendship Networks in an Organization
2016 (English)In: Network Science, ISSN 2050-1242, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 364-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the pivotal role that both power and interpersonal trust play in a multitude of social exchange situations, relatively little is known about their interplay. Moreover, previous theorizing makes competing claims. Do we consider our relatively more powerful exchange partners to be less trustworthy, as rational choice reasoning would suggest? Or do more complex psychological mechanisms lead us to trust them more, as motivated cognition reasoning implies? Extending the latter approach, we develop and empirically test three hypotheses on the interrelation between perceptions of interpersonal trust and power. According to the status value hypothesis, individuals are more likely to befriend those whom they or others perceive as powerful. The status signaling hypothesis states that the friends of people one perceives as powerful will also be seen as powerful. According to the self-monitoring hypothesis, high self-monitors are more likely than low self-monitors to befriend those they or others perceive as powerful. We use multiplex stochastic actor-based models to analyze the co-evolution of trust and power relations among n=49 employees in a Dutch Youth Care organization. Data covers three waves of a longitudinal sociometric network survey collected over a period of 18 months in the years 2009–2010. In general, we find some support for all three hypotheses, though the effects are weak. Being one of the first organizational field studies on the co-evolution of power and trust, we conclude with discussing the implications of these findings for the study of social exchange processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2016
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142562 (URN)10.1017/nws.2016.7 (DOI)000383885200005 ()2-s2.0-84991497848 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2017-12-22Bibliographically approved
Franken, A., Moffitt, T., Steglich, C., Dijkstra, J. K., Harakeh, Z. & Vollebergh, W. (2016). The role of self-control and early adolescents’ friendships in the development of externalizing behavior: The SNARE study. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45(9), 1800-1811
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of self-control and early adolescents’ friendships in the development of externalizing behavior: The SNARE study
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 1800-1811Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This social network study investigated themoderating role of self-control in the association betweenfriendship and the development of externalizing behavior: Antisocial behavior, alcohol use, tobacco use. Previous studies have shown inconsistent findings, and did not control for possible friendship network or selection effects. We tested two complementary hypotheses: (1) That early adolescents with low self-control develop externalizing behavior regardless of their friends’ behavior, or (2) as aresult of being influenced by their friends’ externalizing behavior to a greater extent. Hypotheses were investigated using data from the SNARE (Social Network Analysis of Risk behavior in Early adolescence) study (N = 1144,50 % boys, Mage 12.7, SD = 0.47). We controlled for selection effects and the network structure, using a data analysis package called SIENA. The main findings indicate that personal low self-control and friends’ externalizing behaviors both predict early adolescents’ increasing externalizing behaviors, but they do so independently. Therefore, interventions should focus on all early adolescents’with a lower self-control, rather than focus on those adolescents with a lower self-control who also have friendswho engage in externalizing behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2016
Keywords
Alcohol use, Antisocial behavior, Self-control, Social network analysis, SIENA, Tobacco use
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142555 (URN)10.1007/s10964-015-0287-z (DOI)000384566100006 ()25922116 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84928603164 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
van der Ploeg, R., Steglich, C. & Veenstra, R. (2016). The Support Group Approach in the Dutch KiVa Anti-Bullying Programme: Effects on Victimisation, Defending and Well-Being at School. Educational research (Windsor. Print), 58(3), 221-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Support Group Approach in the Dutch KiVa Anti-Bullying Programme: Effects on Victimisation, Defending and Well-Being at School
2016 (English)In: Educational research (Windsor. Print), ISSN 0013-1881, E-ISSN 1469-5847, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 221-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: School bullying is a wide-spread problem with severe consequences for victims, bullies and bystanders. Schools are strongly encouraged to implement both schoolwide, preventive interventions and reactive measures to handle existing bullying situations. In the Dutch implementation of the KiVa anti-bullying programme, pervasive-bullying situations are addressed according to the support group approach. The support group approach is widely used for addressing bullying situations, but little is known about its effectiveness.

Purpose: We investigated the effectiveness of the support group approach in reducing victimisation, increasing defending and improving the victim’s well-being over the course of a school year, over and beyond of the effects of the universal KiVa intervention.

Programme description: The support group approach is a non-punitive, problem-solving strategy to address pervasive-bullying situations. In this intervention, trained teachers form a support group that consists of 6–8 children, including the bullies and their assistants, defenders or friends of the victim and prosocial classmates. The purpose of the support group isto create mutual concern for the well-being of the victim and to trigger the bullies’ willingness to alter their behaviour.

Sample: We used data from 66 Dutch elementary schools that participated in the KiVa intervention study. Data were collected inOctober 2012 and 2013, and May 2013 and 2014. The sample usedin the analyses consisted of 38 victims for whom a support group intervention was organised (44.7% boy, Mage = 9.24; SDage = 1.20).

Design and method: To get insight into the effects above and beyond those of the KiVa programme itself, victims with a support group (N=38) were matched to similar victims without a support group (N=571). Statistical analyses were undertaken to examine whether the changes in victimisation, defending and well-being at school differed between the two groups.

Result: Victims reported positive effects of the support group approach in reducing victimisation in the short term, but this decrease in victimisation was not lasting over the course of a school year. The intervention also did not improve the victims’ well-being at school inthe longer term. Victims with a support group, however, were found to have more defenders at the end of the school year than victims without a support group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
Anti-bullying intervention, support group, victimisation, defending, well-being
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142564 (URN)10.1080/00131881.2016.1184949 (DOI)000382584500001 ()2-s2.0-84971483910 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
van Rijsewijk, L., Dijkstra, J. K., Pattiselanno, K., Steglich, C. & Veenstra, R. (2016). Who helps whom?: Investigating the development of adolescent prosocial relationships. Developmental Psychology, 52, 894-908
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who helps whom?: Investigating the development of adolescent prosocial relationships
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2016 (English)In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 52, p. 894-908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated adolescent prosocial relations by examining social networks based on the question “Who helps you (e.g., with homework, with repairing a flat [bicycle] tire, or when you are feeling down?).” The effects of individual characteristics (academic achievement, symptoms of depressive mood, and peer status) on receiving help and giving help were examined, and we investigated the contribution of (dis)similarity between adolescents to the development of prosocial relations. Gender, structural network characteristics, and friendship relations were taken into account. Data were derived from the Social Network Analysis of Risk behavior in Early adolescence (SNARE) study, and contained information on students in 40 secondary school classes across 3 waves (N 840, M age 13.4, 49.7% boys). Results from longitudinal social network analyses (RSiena) revealed tendencies toward reciprocation of help and exchange of help within helping groups. Furthermore, boys were less often mentioned as helpers, particularly by girls. Depressed adolescents were less often mentioned as helpers, especially by low depressed peers. Moreover, lower academic achievers indicated that they received help from their higher achieving peers. Rejected adolescents received help more often, but they less often helped low-rejected peers. Last, low- and high-popular adolescents less often helped each other, and also high-popular adolescents less often helped each other. These findings show that (dis)similarity in these characteristics is an important driving factor underlying the emergence and development of prosocial relations in the peer context, and that prosocial behavior should be defined in terms of benefitting particular others.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2016
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142569 (URN)10.1037/dev0000106 (DOI)000377958700006 ()27228450 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84970029029 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9097-0873

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