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Malacrinò, AntoninoORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0811-1229
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Malacrinò, A., Kimber, C., Brengdahl, M. & Friberg, U. (2019). Heightened condition-dependence of the sexual transcriptome as a function of genetic quality in Drosophila melanogaster head tissue. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 286(1906), Article ID 20190819.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heightened condition-dependence of the sexual transcriptome as a function of genetic quality in Drosophila melanogaster head tissue
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 286, no 1906, article id 20190819Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Theory suggests sexual traits should show heightened condition-dependent expression. This prediction has been tested extensively in experiments where condition has been manipulated through environmental quality. Condition-dependence as a function of genetic quality has, however, only rarely been addressed, despite its central importance in evolutionary theory. To address the effect of genetic quality on expression of sexual and non-sexual traits, we here compare gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster head tissue between flies with intact genomes (high condition) and flies carrying a major deleterious mutation (low condition). We find that sex-biased genes show heightened condition-dependent expression in both sexes, and that expression in low condition males and females regresses towards a more similar expression profile. As predicted, sex-biased expression was more sensitive to condition in males compared to females, but surprisingly female-biased, rather than male-biased, genes show higher sensitivity to condition in both sexes. Our results thus support the fundamental predictions of the theory of condition-dependence when condition is a function of genetic quality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: The Royal Society Publishing, 2019
Keywords
condition-dependence; Drosophila melanogaster; gene expression; genetic quality; sexual dimorphism
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159261 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2019.0819 (DOI)000475797600010 ()31288700 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069302814 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Lawski Foundation; Swedish Research Council

Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Bennett, A. E., Orrell, P., Malacrinò, A. & Pozo, M. J. (2018). Fungal-Mediated Above–Belowground Interactions: The Community Approach, Stability, Evolution, Mechanisms, and Applications. In: Ohgushi, Takayuki; Wurst, Susanne; Johnson, Scott N. (Ed.), Aboveground–Belowground Community Ecology: (pp. 85-116). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fungal-Mediated Above–Belowground Interactions: The Community Approach, Stability, Evolution, Mechanisms, and Applications
2018 (English)In: Aboveground–Belowground Community Ecology / [ed] Ohgushi, Takayuki; Wurst, Susanne; Johnson, Scott N., Springer, 2018, p. 85-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Our goal within this chapter is to review fungal-mediated above–belowground interactions in which belowground organisms influence aboveground organisms (or vice versa) primarily via a shared host plant, but to also highlight what we feel are the biggest areas for future research within this field: the community approach, stability, evolution, mechanisms, and application of these interactions. First, the community approach examines multiple simultaneously interacting species as communities, an approach that will greatly benefit from the future use of -omics techniques. Examining a greater diversity of interactions (via competition, facilitation, or predation) will likely reveal more varied outcomes that better describe patterns in nature than when individual interactions are considered. Second, we explore the stability of fungal-mediated above–belowground interactions. Given that systems can have multiple stable states influenced by multiple factors, we ask how frequently these interactions occur across stable states. Third, we present three areas in which we expect selection to influence fungal above–belowground interactions: simple (one-way) selective influences of organisms; evolutionary feedbacks and co-evolutionary arms races; and indirect versus direct selective influences. Fourth, we identify mechanisms driving the indirect interactions observed via host plants in fungal-mediated above–belowground interactions and factors influencing their context dependency. Finally, we explore potential applications of these interactions as novel biotechnologies to promote agricultural production, restore natural and degraded habitats, promote ecosystem services, and mitigate against the impacts of climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Series
Ecological Studies, ISSN 0070-8356 ; 234
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151715 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-91614-9_5 (DOI)9783319916132 (ISBN)9783319916149 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Brengdahl, M., Kimber, C., Maguire-Baxter, J., Malacrinò, A. & Friberg, U. (2018). Genetic Quality Affects the Rate of Male and Female Reproductive Aging Differently in Drosophila melanogaster. American Naturalist, 192(6), 761-772
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic Quality Affects the Rate of Male and Female Reproductive Aging Differently in Drosophila melanogaster
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2018 (English)In: American Naturalist, ISSN 0003-0147, E-ISSN 1537-5323, Vol. 192, no 6, p. 761-772Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Males and females often maximize fitness by pursuing different reproductive strategies, with males commonly assumed to benefit more from increased resource allocation into current reproduction. Such investment should trade off with somatic maintenance and may explain why males frequently live shorter than females. It also predicts that males should experience faster reproductive aging. Here we investigate whether reproductive aging and life span respond to condition differently in male and female Drosophila melanogaster, as predicted if sexual selection has shaped male and female resource-allocation patterns. We manipulate condition through genetic quality by comparing individuals inbred or outbred for a major autosome. While genetic quality had a similar effect on condition in both sexes, condition had a much larger general effect on male reproductive output than on female reproductive output, as expected when sexual selection on vigor acts more strongly on males. We find no differences in reproductive aging between the sexes in low condition, but in high condition reproductive aging is relatively faster in males. No corresponding sex-specific change was found for life span. The sex difference in reproductive aging appearing in high condition was specifically due to a decreased aging rate in females rather than any change in males. Our results suggest that females age slower than males in high condition primarily because sexual selection has favored sex differences in resource allocation under high condition, with females allocating relatively more toward somatic maintenance than males.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Chicago Press, 2018
Keywords
aging; condition; Drosophila melanogaster; genetic quality; sex differences; sexual selection
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153151 (URN)10.1086/700117 (DOI)000450454800010 ()30444654 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055256416 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Helge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse; Royal Physiographic Society in Lund; Swedish Research Council; Lawski Foundation

Available from: 2018-12-01 Created: 2018-12-01 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Malacrinò, A., Campolo, O., Medina, R. F. & Palmeri, V. (2018). Instar- and host-associated differentiation of bacterial communities in the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata. PLoS ONE, 13(3), Article ID e0194131.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Instar- and host-associated differentiation of bacterial communities in the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0194131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microorganisms are acknowledged for their role in shaping insects' evolution, life history and ecology. Previous studies have shown that microbial communities harbored within insects vary through ontogenetic development and among insects feeding on different host-plant species. In this study, we characterized the bacterial microbiota of the highly polyphagous Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), at different instars and when feeding on different host-plant species. Our results show that the bacterial microbiota hosted within the Mediterranean fruit fly differs among instars and host-plant species. Most of the bacteria harbored by the Mediterranean fruit fly belong to the phylum Proteobacteria, including genera of Alphaproteobacteria such as Acetobacter and Gluconobacter; Betaprotobacteria such as Burkholderia and Gammaproteobacteria such as Pseudomonas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Plos, 2018
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147252 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0194131 (DOI)29518170 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-12 Created: 2018-04-12 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Malacrinò, A. (2018). Meta-Omics Tools in the World of Insect-Microorganism Interactions. Biology, 7(4), Article ID E50.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meta-Omics Tools in the World of Insect-Microorganism Interactions
2018 (English)In: Biology, ISSN 2079-7737, Vol. 7, no 4, article id E50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microorganisms are able to influence several aspects of insects' life, and this statement is gaining increasing strength, as research demonstrates it daily. At the same time, new sequencing technologies are now available at a lower cost per base, and bioinformatic procedures are becoming more user-friendly. This is triggering a huge effort in studying the microbial diversity associated to insects, and especially to economically important insect pests. The importance of the microbiome has been widely acknowledged for a wide range of animals, and also for insects this topic is gaining considerable importance. In addition to bacterial-associates, the insect-associated fungal communities are also gaining attention, especially those including plant pathogens. The use of meta-omics tools is not restricted to the description of the microbial world, but it can be also used in bio-surveillance, food safety assessment, or even to bring novelties to the industry. This mini-review aims to give a wide overview of how meta-omics tools are fostering advances in research on insect-microorganism interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
insect pests, metagenomics, metaproteomics, metatranscriptomics, microbiome
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153262 (URN)10.3390/biology7040050 (DOI)000455063300005 ()30486337 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0811-1229

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