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Zhou, J. (2016). Chinese agrarian capitalism in the Russian Far East. Third World Quarterly, 1(5), 612-632
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chinese agrarian capitalism in the Russian Far East
2016 (English)In: Third World Quarterly, ISSN 0143-6597, E-ISSN 1360-2241, Vol. 1, no 5, p. 612-632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chinese actors have been actively engaged in agriculture in the Russian Far East since border liberalisation, from agriculture labourers, independent farmers with small- and medium-sized plots, to capital-rich agribusinesses that cultivate farmland on a much larger scale. With the use of wage labour and other capitalised production inputs, the occurrence of economic differentiation among producers and strong profit-seeking drivers, this stands in contrast to the situation within China itself – where institutional and structural constraints still limit the development of full-blown capitalist agriculture. This article presents the first case study of this phenomenon, in comparative perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
Russia; China; Agrarian Change; Agriculture
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156506 (URN)10.1080/23802014.2016.1327795 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-24 Created: 2019-04-24 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved
Zhou, J. (2012). The Muslim Battalions: Soviet Central Asians in the Soviet-Afghan war. Journal of Slavic Military Studies, 25(3), 302-328
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Muslim Battalions: Soviet Central Asians in the Soviet-Afghan war
2012 (English)In: Journal of Slavic Military Studies, ISSN 1351-8046, E-ISSN 1556-3006, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 302-328Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article concerns the Soviet military's use of soldiers of Afghan ethnicities (Uzbek, Tajik, Turkmen, and others) during its war in Afghanistan, both as spetsnazand more generally in the 40th army. Special Forces Detachment 154 and Special Forces Detachment 177, the first and second ‘Muslim Battalions,’ would play important roles not only during the palace takeover in December 1979 but also during the 1983 cease-fire in Panjshir. This article challenges earlier views that Soviet Muslims and Central Asians were unreliable soldiers who colluded with mujahedin, and points to a more balanced perspective of their role in Afghanistan.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2012
Keywords
Soviet-Afghan War; Nationality; Islam; History; War
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156507 (URN)10.1080/13518046.2012.705567 (DOI)2-s2.0-84866088856 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-24 Created: 2019-04-24 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1173-3114

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