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Cocaine falls into oblivion during volitional initiation of choice trials
Univ Poitiers, France.
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5615-2973
Univ Bordeaux, France; Inst Neurosci Cognit & Integrat Aquitaine, France.
Univ Bordeaux, France; Inst Neurosci Cognit & Integrat Aquitaine, France.
2022 (English)In: Addiction Biology, ISSN 1355-6215, E-ISSN 1369-1600, Vol. 27, no 6, article id e13235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When facing a choice, most animals quit drugs in favour of a variety of nondrug alternatives. We recently found, rather unexpectedly, that choice of the nondrug alternative is in fact inflexible and habitual. One possible contributing factor to habitual choice is the intermittency and uncontrollability of choice trials in previous studies. Here, we asked whether and to what extent volitional control over the occurrence of choice trials could change animals preference by preventing habitual choice. To do so, rats were trained to nosepoke in a hole to trigger the presentation of two operant levers: one associated with cocaine, the other with saccharin. Rats were then free to choose among the two levers to obtain the corresponding reward, after which both levers retracted until rats self-initiated the next choice trial. Overall, we found that volitional control over choice trials did not change preference. Most rats preferred saccharin over cocaine and selected this option almost exclusively. Intriguingly, after repeated choice and consumption of saccharin, rats transiently lost interest in this option (i.e., due to sensory-specific satiety), but they did not switch to cocaine, preferring instead to pause during long periods of time before reinitiating a choice trial for saccharin. This finding suggests that during volitional initiation of a choice trial, rats fail to consider cocaine as an option. We discuss a possible associative mechanism to explain this perplexing behaviour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2022. Vol. 27, no 6, article id e13235
Keywords [en]
addiction; choice; self-administration
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-189299DOI: 10.1111/adb.13235ISI: 000863629000001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-189299DiVA, id: diva2:1704516
Note

Funding Agencies|French Research Council (CNRS); Universite de Bordeaux; French National Agency [ANR2010-BLAN-1404-01]; Ministere de lEnseignement Superieur et de la Recherche (MESR)

Available from: 2022-10-18 Created: 2022-10-18 Last updated: 2022-10-18

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