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Sexual conflict promotes speciation in insects.
Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Animal Ecology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Animal Ecology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Animal Ecology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.ORCID-id: 0000-0001-6112-9586
Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Animal Ecology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
2000 (Engelska)Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 97, nr 19, s. 10460-10464Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

Speciation rates among extant lineages of organisms vary extensively, but our understanding of the causes of this variation and, therefore, the processes of speciation is still remarkably incomplete. Both theoretical and empirical studies have indicated that sexual selection is important in speciation, but earlier discussions have focused almost exclusively on the potential role of female mate choice. Recent findings of postmating reproductive conflicts of interest between the sexes suggest a quite different route to speciation. Such conflicts may lead to perpetual antagonistic coevolution between males and females and may thus generate rapid evolutionary divergence of traits involved in reproduction. Here, we assess this hypothesis by contrasting pairs of related groups of insect species differing in the opportunity for postmating sexual conflict. Groups where females mate with many males exhibited speciation rates four times as high as in related groups where females mate only once. Our results not only highlight the general importance of postmating sexual selection in speciation, but also support the recent suggestion that sexual conflict is a key engine of speciation.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
National Academy of Sciences , 2000. Vol. 97, nr 19, s. 10460-10464
Nationell ämneskategori
Evolutionsbiologi
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137049DOI: 10.1073/pnas.97.19.10460ISI: 000089341400032PubMedID: 10984538OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-137049DiVA, id: diva2:1092255
Tillgänglig från: 2017-05-02 Skapad: 2017-05-02 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-05-09Bibliografiskt granskad

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Friberg, Urban
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