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Showing friendship. fighting back, and getting even: resisting bullying victimisation within adolescent girls´friendships
Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9233-3862
2018 (English)In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1141-1158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research suggests that about a quarter of bullying incidences occur within friendships. Yet little attention is given to the underlying social processes and wider macro-system forces that shape friendship victimization experiences. Guided by constructivist grounded theory and Wade's work on resistance, this research explored the phenomenon of victimization within adolescent girls’ friendships. Canadian women reflecting on their school-based victimization experiences were interviewed for this study. Results suggest that participants resisted victimization in important ways but that their resistance strategies were negotiated within gender expectations and ambient discursive constructions of resistance and victimization. Our findings illuminate the ways that discourses concealing women's resistance and privileging overt responses to bullying run counter to gendered expectations for resistance, leaving women in a double bind. Consequently, we found that retaliatory relational aggression allowed girls to deny their victim status while complying with gendered expectations for resistance but led to their bullying experiences being normalized and overlooked.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018. Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1141-1158
Keywords [en]
Resistance, bullying, victimization, qualitative, friendship, gender
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Social Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150901DOI: 10.1080/13676261.2018.1450970ISI: 000444091200001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85044073563OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-150901DiVA, id: diva2:1245006
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-10-04Bibliographically approved

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Forsberg, CamillaThornberg, Robert

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf