liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Genetic Quality Affects the Rate of Male and Female Reproductive Aging Differently in Drosophila melanogaster
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1052-7274
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (AVIAN Behav Genom and Physiol Grp)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0811-1229
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: American Naturalist, ISSN 0003-0147, E-ISSN 1537-5323, Vol. 192, no 6, p. 761-772Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Males and females often maximize fitness by pursuing different reproductive strategies, with males commonly assumed to benefit more from increased resource allocation into current reproduction. Such investment should trade off with somatic maintenance and may explain why males frequently live shorter than females. It also predicts that males should experience faster reproductive aging. Here we investigate whether reproductive aging and life span respond to condition differently in male and female Drosophila melanogaster, as predicted if sexual selection has shaped male and female resource-allocation patterns. We manipulate condition through genetic quality by comparing individuals inbred or outbred for a major autosome. While genetic quality had a similar effect on condition in both sexes, condition had a much larger general effect on male reproductive output than on female reproductive output, as expected when sexual selection on vigor acts more strongly on males. We find no differences in reproductive aging between the sexes in low condition, but in high condition reproductive aging is relatively faster in males. No corresponding sex-specific change was found for life span. The sex difference in reproductive aging appearing in high condition was specifically due to a decreased aging rate in females rather than any change in males. Our results suggest that females age slower than males in high condition primarily because sexual selection has favored sex differences in resource allocation under high condition, with females allocating relatively more toward somatic maintenance than males.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Chicago Press, 2018. Vol. 192, no 6, p. 761-772
Keywords [en]
aging; condition; Drosophila melanogaster; genetic quality; sex differences; sexual selection
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153151DOI: 10.1086/700117ISI: 000450454800010PubMedID: 30444654Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85055256416OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-153151DiVA, id: diva2:1267337
Note

Funding Agencies|Helge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse; Royal Physiographic Society in Lund; Swedish Research Council; Lawski Foundation

Available from: 2018-12-01 Created: 2018-12-01 Last updated: 2023-10-25Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The effects of deleterious mutations on ageing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of deleterious mutations on ageing
2022 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Ageing is defined as the deterioration of an individual's physiological performance with advancing age, which leads to a decrease in reproduction and/or survival. The question why most organisms age has preoccupied humans for millennia and, over the last decades, resulted in an ever-increasing research effort to understand this phenomenon. The full explanation for why we age has, however, remained elusive. Evolutionary theories of ageing are based on two assumptions, which together inevitably result in organismal ageing, that the strength of selection declines with age and that mutations have age-specific effects. While a declining strength of selection with age naturally follows from external sources of death, the age-specific properties of mutations is a topic we only have a rudimentary understanding of. Established theories of ageing predict that mutations either have a beneficial or neutral effect early in life, and a deleterious effect later in life. New theory suggests that mutations with a small negative effect already early in life can also contribute to the evolution of ageing, a possibility that potentially explains empirical results that have been difficult to reconcile with current theories. Deleterious mutations may also directly or indirectly explain the sex differences in ageing and lifespan that are observed in many species.

In this thesis, I investigate the age-specificity of deleterious mutations and test if they contribute to sex differences in ageing and lifespan. In paper I and II, I investigate the age-specificity of a set of supposedly deleterious mutations, by estimating their effect on fecundity in young, middle-aged and moderately old Drosophila melanogaster females. The majority of tested mutations show age-specific effects, with a detrimental effect that gradually increases with advancing age. These results thus support that mutations expressing a small negative effect already at an early age also can contribute to the evolution of ageing.

In paper III, I manipulate the expression of autosomal deleterious mutations in D. melanogaster through inbreeding, and test if this has different effects on male and female ageing as predicted if sexual selection has shaped sex differences in ageing through condition-dependent investment in current reproduction. I find a sex difference in ageing in high condition, but not in low condition flies, suggesting that sexual selection indeed has shaped how resources are allocated between reproduction and somatic maintenance in relation to condition. I did not find a corresponding response for lifespan.

In paper IV, I investigate if sex differences in lifespan are partly explained by the unconditional expression of recessive deleterious mutations on the single X-chromosome in males (the Unguarded X hypothesis). I test this hypothesis by forcing D. melanogaster females to express recessive mutations on the X-chromosome to the same extent as males do and assess their effect on female lifespan. This direct test did not show the expected reduction in female lifespan and thus fails to support the Unguarded X hypothesis as a major explanation of sex differences in lifespan.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2022. p. 58
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 2197
Keywords
Ageing, Age-specific effects, Deleterious mutations, Drosophila melanogaster, Lifespan, Sex differences
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-182570 (URN)10.3384/9789179291570 (DOI)9789179291563 (ISBN)9789179291570 (ISBN)
Public defence
2022-04-29, Nobel BL32, B Building, Campus Valla, Linköping, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2022-03-18 Created: 2022-01-27 Last updated: 2024-01-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1804 kB)450 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1804 kBChecksum SHA-512
8e3822ad20c5ec358930a538f5685012df6f69e1b30fdf1eda04501cbfacd724aaf05e08f68120372849b8755c631d97b7d110f13831b7f6980de32239f8b77a
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Malacrinò, Antonino

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Brengdahl, MartinKimber, ChristopherMaguire-Baxter, JackMalacrinò, AntoninoFriberg, Urban
By organisation
BiologyFaculty of Science & Engineering
In the same journal
American Naturalist
Evolutionary Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 450 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 222 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf