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Targeting Mitochondria for Treatment of Chemoresistant Ovarian Cancer
Univ Minnesota, MN 55455 USA.
Univ Minnesota, MN 55455 USA.
Univ Minnesota, MN 55455 USA.
Univ Virginia, VA 22908 USA.
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 229Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the Western world. This is due, in part, to the fact that despite standard treatment of surgery and platinum/paclitaxel most patients recur with ultimately chemoresistant disease. Ovarian cancer is a unique form of solid tumor that develops, metastasizes and recurs in the same space, the abdominal cavity, which becomes a unique microenvironment characterized by ascites, hypoxia and low glucose levels. It is under these conditions that cancer cells adapt and switch to mitochondrial respiration, which becomes crucial to their survival, and therefore an ideal metabolic target for chemoresistant ovarian cancer. Importantly, independent of microenvironmental factors, mitochondria spatial redistribution has been associated to both tumor metastasis and chemoresistance in ovarian cancer while specific sets of genetic mutations have been shown to cause aberrant dependence on mitochondrial pathways in the most aggressive ovarian cancer subtypes. In this review we summarize on targeting mitochondria for treatment of chemoresistant ovarian cancer and current state of understanding of the role of mitochondria respiration in ovarian cancer. We feel this is an important and timely topic given that ovarian cancer remains the deadliest of the gynecological diseases, and that the mitochondrial pathway has recently emerged as critical in sustaining solid tumor progression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI , 2019. Vol. 20, no 1, article id 229
Keywords [en]
ascites; OXPHOS; mitochondrial inhibitor; chemoresistant ovarian cancer; SWI; SNF complex
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155620DOI: 10.3390/ijms20010229ISI: 000459747700229PubMedID: 30626133OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-155620DiVA, id: diva2:1297726
Note

Funding Agencies|Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Research Program [OC160377]; Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance; Randy Shaver Cancer Research Funds

Available from: 2019-03-20 Created: 2019-03-20 Last updated: 2019-08-29

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