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Isocyanates and hydrogen cyanide in fumes from heated proteins and protein-rich foods
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
2019 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 291-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Toxic compounds in cooking fumes could cause respiratory problems. In the present study, the formation of isocyanic acid (ICA), methyl isocyanate (MIC), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was studied during the heating of proteins or frying of protein-rich foods. Heating was performed in an experimental setup using a tube oven set at 200-500 degrees C and in a kitchen when foods with different protein content were fried at a temperature around 300 degrees C. ICA, MIC, and HCN were all generated when protein or meat was heated. Individual amino acids were also heated, and there was a significant positive correlation between their respective nitrogen content and the formation of the measured compounds. Gas from heated protein or meat also caused carbamylation in albumin. ICA, MIC, and HCN were also present in fumes generated when meat, egg, and halloumi were fried in a kitchen pan. The levels of ICA were here twice that of the Swedish occupational exposure limit. If ICA, MIC, and HCN in fumes from heated protein-rich foods could contribute to the risk of airway dysfunction among those exposed is not clear, but it is important to avoid inhaling frying and grilling fumes and to equip kitchens with good exhaust ventilation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2019. Vol. 29, no 2, p. 291-298
Keywords [en]
airway irritants; carbamylation; foods; isocyanic acid; kitchen smoke; protein
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155564DOI: 10.1111/ina.12526ISI: 000459637200012PubMedID: 30548495OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-155564DiVA, id: diva2:1299379
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden [LIO-677581, LIO-702611]

Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-07-23

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The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-12 15:48
Available from 2019-12-12 15:48

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