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Maternal, placental and cord blood cytokines and the risk of adverse birth outcomes among pregnant women infected with Schistosoma japonicum in the Philippines
Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA.
Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA.
Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Univ Seoul, South Korea.
Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA.
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2019 (English)In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, ISSN 1935-2727, E-ISSN 1935-2735, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e0007371Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background The objectives of this study were to 1) evaluate the influence of treatment with praziquantel on the inflammatory milieu in maternal, placental, and cord blood, 2) assess the extent to which proinflammatory signatures in placental and cord blood impacts birth outcomes, and 3) evaluate the impact of other helminths on the inflammatory micro environment. Methods/Findings This was a secondary analysis of samples from 369 mother-infant pairs participating in a randomized controlled trial of praziquantel given at 12-16 weeks gestation. We performed regression analysis to address our study objectives. In maternal peripheral blood, the concentrations of CXCL8, and TNF receptor I and II decreased from 12 to 32 weeks gestation, while IL-13 increased. Praziquantel treatment did not significantly alter the trajectory of the concentration of any of the cytokines examined. Hookworm infection was associated with elevated placental IL-1, CXCL8 and IFN-gamma. The risk of small-for-gestational age increased with elevated IL-6, IL-10, and CXCL8 in cord blood. The risk of prematurity was increased when cord blood sTNFRI and placental IL-5 were elevated. Conclusions Our study suggests that fetal cytokines, which may be related to infectious disease exposures, contribute to poor intrauterine growth. Additionally, hookworm infection influences cytokine concentrations at the maternal-fetal interface. Clinical Trial Registry number and website ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00486863). Author summary Schistosomiasis is one of the most prevalent parasitic tropical diseases, and it is primarily treated with the drug praziquantel. This study examined the effects of praziquantel treatment for schistosomiasis and the presence of geohelminth infections during pregnancy on cytokines in maternal, placental, and cord blood, and examined the effects of pro-inflammatory signatures at the maternal-fetal interface on perinatal outcomes. We analyzed the data of 369 mother-infant pairs obtained from a randomized controlled trial of praziquantel given at 12-16 weeks gestation. Praziquantel treatment did not significantly alter the trajectory of the concentration of any of the cytokines examined. Elevated levels of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines were associated with the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes (small-for-gestational age and prematurity). Hookworm coinfection at 12 weeks gestation was, however, related to elevated levels of certain cytokines in the placenta (IL-1, IL-5, CXCL8 and IFN-gamma).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE , 2019. Vol. 13, no 6, article id e0007371
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159073DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0007371ISI: 000473779100014PubMedID: 31188820OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-159073DiVA, id: diva2:1338408
Note

Funding Agencies|NIH/NIAID [U01AI066050, R21AI107520]

Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-07-22 Last updated: 2019-08-20

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Ernerudh, Jan
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Division of Neuro and Inflammation ScienceFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine
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