liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Cross-laminated timber flooring and concrete slab flooring: A comparativestudy of structural design, economic and environmental consequences
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (Byggteknik)
Huskvarna, Sweden.
Katrineholm, Sweden.
2019 (English)In: Journal of Building Engineering, E-ISSN 2352-7102, Vol. 26, p. 1-16, article id 100881Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper compares cross-laminated timber (CLT) flooring and concrete slab flooring with respect to structural design, cost analysis, and greenhouse gas emissions. The effect of floor span on design values, costs, and carbondioxide emissions is analysed in terms of structural design, economy, and environmental impact. Different crosssections are chosen for this purpose. The study shows that CLT flooring has significantly lower emissions ofclimate-impact greenhouse gases, and its ability to store carbon is significantly greater than the capacity of concrete storage. From an economic point of view, the CLT material is more expensive than concrete. However, the estimated “ready-to-assemble” cost of both floor types is quite similar. The study shows that CLT flooring can compete with a concrete slab floor when it comes to a span as wide as 7m without violating the structural requirements. However, with an increase in span, it is more difficult to meet the requirements for vibration for aCLT floor than for a concrete slab. At shorter spans, the moment capacity is often a decisive factor for concrete slabs while deformation is the decisive factor for a CLT floor. For larger spans, resonance frequency and deformation are crucial for the CLT floor, while the long-term deformation of the concrete is the decisive factor in structural design.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 26, p. 1-16, article id 100881
Keywords [en]
Eurocode 2, Eurocode 3, Greenhouse effects, Cost analysis, Timber and concrete slabs
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159510DOI: 10.1016/j.jobe.2019.100881Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85069640267OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-159510DiVA, id: diva2:1341745
Available from: 2019-08-10 Created: 2019-08-10 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Hassan, Osama

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hassan, Osama
By organisation
Communications and Transport SystemsFaculty of Science & Engineering
In the same journal
Journal of Building Engineering
Building Technologies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 3 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf