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Modulating Inflammation in Monocytes Using Capillary Fiber Organic Electronic Ion Pumps
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9431-741X
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5154-0291
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2019 (English)In: Advanced Healthcare Materials, ISSN 2192-2640, E-ISSN 2192-2659, Vol. 8, no 19, article id 1900813Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) delivers ions and drugs from a source, through a charge selective membrane, to a target upon an electric bias. Miniaturization of this technology is crucial and will provide several advantages, ranging from better spatiotemporal control of delivery to reduced invasiveness for implanted OEIPs. To miniaturize OEIPs, new configurations have been developed based on glass capillary fibers filled with an anion exchange membrane (AEM). Fiber capillary OEIPs can be easily implanted in proximity to targeted cells and tissues. Herein, the efficacy of such a fiber capillary OEIP for modulation of inflammation in human monocytes is demonstrated. The devices are located on inflammatory monocytes and local delivery of salicylic acid (SA) is initiated. Highly localized SA delivery results in a significant decrease in cytokine (tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6) levels after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. The findings-the first use of such capillary OEIPs in mammalian cells or systems-demonstrate the utility of the technology for optimizing transport and delivery of different therapeutic substances at low concentrations, with the benefit of local and controlled administration that limits the adverse effect of oral/systemic drug delivery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2019. Vol. 8, no 19, article id 1900813
Keywords [en]
bioelectronics; capillary fibers; cytokines; drug delivery; electrophoresis; inflammation; ion exchange membranes; iontronics; organic electronics
National Category
Biophysics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161161DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201900813ISI: 000486128400001PubMedID: 31502760OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-161161DiVA, id: diva2:1365745
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Foundation for Strategic ResearchSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research [RIT15-0119]; Advanced Functional Materials SFO-Center at Linkoping University; International Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Advanced Functional Materials, Linkopings Universitet; Onnesjo Foundation; Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationKnut & Alice Wallenberg Foundation

Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2020-02-17
In thesis
1. Overcoming Limitations of Iontronic Delivery Devices
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Overcoming Limitations of Iontronic Delivery Devices
2020 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Organic electronic devices are considered as one of the best candidates to replace conventional inorganic electronic devices due to their electronic conductive functionality, low-cost production techniques, the ability to tune their optical and electronic properties using organic chemistry, and their mechanical flexibility. Moreover, these systems are ideal for bioelectronic applications due to their softness, biocompatibility, and most importantly, their electronic and ionic transport. Indeed, these materials are compatible with biological tissues and cells improving the signal transduction between electronic devices and electrically excitable cells. As ions serve as one of the primary signal carriers of cells, they can selectively tune a cell’s activity; therefore, an improved interface between electronics and biological systems can offer several advantages in healthcare, e.g. the development of efficient drug delivery devices.  

The main focus of this thesis is the development of electronic delivery devices. Electrophoretic delivery devices called organic electronic ion pumps (OEIPs) are used to electronically control the delivery of small ions, neurotransmitters, and drugs with high spatiotemporal resolution. This work elucidates the ion transport processes and phenomena that happen in the ion exchange membranes during ion delivery and clarifies which parameters are crucial for the ion transport efficiency of the OEIPs. This thesis shows a systematic investigation of these parameters and indicates new methods and OEIP designs to overcome these challenges. Two novel OEIP designs are developed and introduced in this thesis to improve the local ion transport while limiting side effects. OEIPs based on palladium proton trap contacts can improve the membrane permselectivity and optimize the delivery of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmitters at low pH while preventing any undesired pH changes from proton transport in the biological systems. And OEIPs based on glass capillary fibers are developed to overcome the limitations of devices on planar substrates, related to more complex and larger biologically relevant ion delivery with low mobility for implantable applications. This design can optimize the transport of ions and drugs such as salicylic acid (SA) at low concentrations and at relatively much higher rates, thereby addressing a wider range of biomedically relevant applications and needs.   

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2020. p. 76
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 2050
National Category
Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163608 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-163608 (DOI)9789179298937 (ISBN)
Public defence
2020-03-06, K3, Kåkenhus, Campus Norrköping, Norrköping, 10:15 (English)
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Supervisors
Available from: 2020-02-17 Created: 2020-02-17 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved

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The full text will be freely available from 2020-09-10 13:45
Available from 2020-09-10 13:45

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