liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Impacts of a shallow shipwreck on a coral reef: A case study from St. Brandon’s Atoll, Mauritius, Indian Ocean.
Environmental Sciences and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.
Environmental Sciences and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.
Environmental Sciences and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5972-1852
Show others and affiliations
2020 (English)In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 156, article id 104916Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Shallow shipwrecks can have severe ecological and toxicological impacts on coral atolls. In 2012, a tuna longliner ran aground on the reef crest of St Brandon’s Atoll, Mauritius, broke up into three pieces which was moved by currents and storms into the lagoon. In the months following the grounding, the coral around the wreck became dead and black. Down-current from the wreck, a dense bloom of filamentous algae (Ulva sp.) attached to coral occurred. To determine the ecological effects of the wreck on the system, the marine biota around the wreck, in the algal bloom, and fish reference zones were counted in 2014. Metal concentrations in reference and affected coral was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS). A pronounced difference was seen in the metal concentration pattern between coral from the wreck- and algal zones, and the coral reference zone. While the wreck zone contained the highest abundance of fish, the fish reference zone had the highest species diversity but with fewer fish. We also counted eleven Critically Endangered hawksbill sea turtles Eretmochelys imbricata and significantly more sea cucumbers in the algal zone than the reference zones. The effects of shipwrecks on coral reefs must be considered a threat over periods of years and should be studied further.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 156, article id 104916
Keywords [en]
algal bloom, black reefs, coral, ecotoxicology, fish, sea cucumbers
National Category
Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163697DOI: 10.1016/j.marenvres.2020.104916OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-163697DiVA, id: diva2:1394208
Available from: 2020-02-18 Created: 2020-02-18 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Kylin, Henrik

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kylin, Henrik
By organisation
Tema Environmental ChangeFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Marine Environmental Research
Environmental SciencesOceanography, Hydrology and Water ResourcesEcology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 13 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf