liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Adverse events in psychiatry: a national cohort study in Sweden with a unique psychiatric trigger tool
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7489-9077
Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2020 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, BMC PSYCHIATRY, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The vast majority of patient safety research has focused on somatic health care. Although specific adverse events (AEs) within psychiatric healthcare have been explored, the overall level and nature of AEs is sparsely investigated.

Methods

Cohort study using a retrospective record review based on a two-step trigger tool methodology in the charts of randomly selected patients 18 years or older admitted to the psychiatric acute care departments in all Swedish regions from January 1 to June 30, 2017. Hospital care together with corresponding outpatient care were reviewed as a continuum, over a maximum of 3 months. The AEs were categorised according to type, severity and preventability.

Results

In total, the medical records of 2552 patients were reviewed. Among the patients, 50.4% were women and 49.6% were men. The median (range) age was 44 (18–97) years for women and 44.5 (18–93) years for men.

In 438 of the reviewed records, 720 AEs were identified, corresponding to the AEs identified in 17.2% [95% confidence interval, 15.7–18.6] of the records. The majority of AEs resulted in less or moderate harm, and 46.2% were considered preventable. Prolonged disease progression and deliberate self-harm were the most common types of AEs. AEs were significantly more common in women (21.5%) than in men (12.7%) but showed no difference between age groups. Severe or catastrophic harm was found in 2.3% of the records, and the majority affected were women (61%). Triggers pointing at deficient quality of care were found in 78% of the records, with the absence of a treatment plan being the most common.

Conclusions

AEs are common in psychiatric care. Aside from further patient safety work, systematic interventions are also warranted to improve the quality of psychiatric care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2020. Vol. 20, no 1, article id 44
Keywords [en]
Adverse event; Patient harm; Patient safety; Trigger tool; Psychiatry
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-164037DOI: 10.1186/s12888-020-2447-2ISI: 000513702400001PubMedID: 32019518Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85078995275OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-164037DiVA, id: diva2:1411779
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions; Linkoping University

Available from: 2020-03-04 Created: 2020-03-04 Last updated: 2020-03-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(622 kB)15 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 622 kBChecksum SHA-512
f94a2e17451428a7b06966fecc6a7be0b19c944deb5e4682163d68ac24d2a997fff2485e7a8035d6cf6a25dac81d37b8ffb1621868f5094629475a6e818ad8bb
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nilsson, LenaBorgstedt-Risberg, Madeleine
By organisation
Division of Drug ResearchFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA)Center for Business support and Development
In the same journal
BMC Psychiatry
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 15 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 44 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf