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A study of guidelines for respiratory tract infections and their references from Swedish GPs: a qualitative analysis
Lund Univ, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
Lund Univ, Sweden; Ctr Primary Hlth Care Res, Sweden.
Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
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2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: National guidelines are important instruments in reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions. Low adherence to guidelines is an acknowledged problem that needs to be addressed.

Method: We evaluated established characteristics for guidelines in the guidelines for lower respiratory tract infection, acute otitis media and pharyngotonsillitis in primary care. We studied how doctors used these guidelines by analysing interviews with 29 general practitioners (GPs) in Sweden.

Results: We found important between-guidelines differences, which we believe affects adherence. The GPs reported persistent preconceptions about diagnosis and treatment, which we believe reduces their adherence to the guidelines.

Conclusion: To increase adherence, it is important to consider doctors’ preconceptions when creating new guidelines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020. Vol. 38, no 1, p. 83-91
Keywords [en]
Adherence to guidelines; antibiotic prescribing; general practice; national guidelines; respiratory tract infections
National Category
Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-164092DOI: 10.1080/02813432.2020.1717073ISI: 000513188300001PubMedID: 32031035Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85079442908OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-164092DiVA, id: diva2:1411803
Note

Funding Agencies|Public Health Agency of Sweden; Department of Research and Development of Region Kronoberg Sweden; South Swedish Regional Council

Available from: 2020-03-04 Created: 2020-03-04 Last updated: 2020-03-25Bibliographically approved

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André, MalinHedin, Katarina
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Department of Health, Medicine and Caring SciencesFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDivision of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf