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Related plants tend to share pollinators and herbivores, but strength of phylogenetic signal varies among plant families
Univ Canterbury, New Zealand; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
Univ Canterbury, New Zealand; Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
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2020 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 226, no 3, p. 909-920Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Related plants are often hypothesized to interact with similar sets of pollinators and herbivores, but this idea has only mixed empirical support. This may be because plant families vary in their tendency to share interaction partners. We quantify overlap of interaction partners for all pairs of plants in 59 pollination and 11 herbivory networks based on the numbers of shared and unshared interaction partners (thereby capturing both proportional and absolute overlap). We test for relationships between phylogenetic distance and partner overlap within each network; whether these relationships varied with the composition of the plant community; and whether well-represented plant families showed different relationships. Across all networks, more closely related plants tended to have greater overlap. The strength of this relationship within a network was unrelated to the composition of the networks plant component, but, when considered separately, different plant families showed different relationships between phylogenetic distance and overlap of interaction partners. The variety of relationships between phylogenetic distance and partner overlap in different plant families probably reflects a comparable variety of ecological and evolutionary processes. Considering factors affecting particular species-rich groups within a community could be the key to understanding the distribution of interactions at the network level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2020. Vol. 226, no 3, p. 909-920
Keywords [en]
ecological networks; herbivory; niche overlap; phylogenetic signal; pollination; specialization
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-164081DOI: 10.1111/nph.16420ISI: 000513380400001PubMedID: 31917859OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-164081DiVA, id: diva2:1411818
Note

Funding Agencies|NSERC PGS-D graduate scholarship; Marsden Fund Fast-Start grantRoyal Society of New ZealandMarsden Fund (NZ) [UOC-1101]; Rutherford Discovery Fellowship

Available from: 2020-03-04 Created: 2020-03-04 Last updated: 2022-10-28

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Ohlsson, MikaelNorstrom, IsabelleWohlfarth, Inger-Marie
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • vancouver
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