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Burn unit design - the missing link for quality and safety.
Victorian Adult Burns Service , Melbourne, Australia.
Norwegian National Burn Center, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
St. Andrews Burns Service, Broomsfield Hospital, Chelmsford, United Kingdom.
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 369-375Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between infrastructure, technology, model of care and human resources influences patient outcomes and safety, staff productivity and satisfaction, retention of personnel, and treatment and social costs. This concept underpins the need for evidence-based design, and has been widely adopted to inform hospital infrastructure planning. The aim of this review is to establish evidence-based, universally-applicable key features of a burn unit that support function in a comprehensive patient-centred model of care. A literature search in medical, architectural and engineering databases was conducted. Burn associations' guidelines and relevant articles published in English, between 1990 and 2020, were included, and the available evidence is summarized in the review. Few studies have been published on burn unit design in the last thirty years. Most of them focus on the role of design in infection control and prevention, and consist primarily of descriptive or observational reports, opportunistic historical cohort studies, and reviews. The evidence available in the literature is not sufficient to create a definitive infrastructure guideline to inform burn unit design, and there are considerable difficulties in creating evidence that will be widely applicable. In the absence of a strong evidence base, consensus guidelines on burn unit infrastructure should be developed, to help healthcare providers, architects and engineers make informed decisions, when designing new or renovated facilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2021. Vol. 42, no 3, p. 369-375
Keywords [en]
burn care, burn centre, burn unit, evidence-based design, infection control, infrastructure
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-173120DOI: 10.1093/jbcr/irab011ISI: 000683376000004PubMedID: 33484267OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-173120DiVA, id: diva2:1525739
Available from: 2021-02-04 Created: 2021-02-04 Last updated: 2021-12-28Bibliographically approved

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Elmasry, MoustafaSjöberg, FolkeSteinvall, Ingrid

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Elmasry, MoustafaSjöberg, FolkeSteinvall, Ingrid
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Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and OncologyFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Hand and Plastic Surgery
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Journal of Burn Care & Research
Surgery

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