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Neurobiological insights from the study of deafness and sign language
Univerity College London, Faculty of Brain Sciences.
University College of London.
University College London, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1896-8250
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2019 (English)In: Understanding deafness, language, and cognitive development: essays in honour of Bencie Woll / [ed] Gary Morgan, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2019, p. 159-181Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The study of deafness and sign language has provided a means of dissociating modality specificity from higher level abstract processes in the brain. Differentiating these is fundamental for establishing the relationship between sensorimotor representations and functional specialisation in the brain. Early deafness in humans provides a unique insight into this problem, because the reorganisation observed in the adult deaf brain is not only due to neural development in the absence of auditory inputs, but also due to the acquisition of visual communication strategies such as sign language and speechreading. Here we report research by scholars who have collaborated with Bencie Woll in understanding the neural reorganisation that occurs as a consequence of early deafness, and its relation to the use of different visual strategies for language. We concentrate on three main topics: functional specialisation of sensory cortices, language and working memory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2019. p. 159-181
Series
Trends in Language Acquisition Research ; 25
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-178822DOI: 10.1075/tilar.25.09carScopus ID: 2-s2.0-85086776444Libris ID: csld3cnz9t2dkk2pISBN: 9789027204493 (print)ISBN: 9789027261861 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-178822DiVA, id: diva2:1589360
Available from: 2021-08-31 Created: 2021-08-31 Last updated: 2022-05-11Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textScopusFind book at a Swedish library/Hitta boken i ett svenskt bibliotek

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Holmer, EmilRönnberg, JerkerRudner, Mary

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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