liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
How Do We Allocate Our Resources When Listening and Memorizing Speech in Noise? A Pupillometry Study
Hannover Med Sch, Germany.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark. (Linnaeus Centre HEAD)
Hannover Med Sch, Germany; Cluster Excellence Hearing4all, Germany.
Oticon AS, Denmark.
Show others and affiliations
2021 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 846-859Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives:

Actively following a conversation can be demanding and limited cognitive resources must be allocated to the processing of speech, retaining and encoding the perceived content, and preparing an answer. The aim of the present study was to disentangle the allocation of effort into the effort required for listening (listening effort) and the effort required for retention (memory effort) by means of pupil dilation.

Design:

Twenty-five normal-hearing German speaking participants underwent a sentence final word identification and recall test, while pupillometry was conducted. The participants task was to listen to a sentence in four-talker babble background noise and to repeat the final word afterward. At the end of a list of sentences, they were asked to recall as many of the final words as possible. Pupil dilation was recorded during different list lengths (three sentences versus six sentences) and varying memory load (recall versus no recall). Additionally, the effect of a noise reduction algorithm on performance, listening effort, and memory effort was evaluated.

Results:

We analyzed pupil dilation both before each sentence (sentence baseline) as well as the dilation in response to each sentence relative to the sentence baseline (sentence dilation). The pupillometry data indicated a steeper increase of sentence baseline under recall compared to no recall, suggesting higher memory effort due to memory processing. This increase in sentence baseline was most prominent toward the end of the longer lists, that is, during the second half of six sentences. Without a recall task, sentence baseline declined over the course of the list. Noise reduction appeared to have a significant influence on effort allocation for listening, which was reflected in generally decreased sentence dilation.

Conclusion:

Our results showed that recording pupil dilation in a speech identification and recall task provides valuable insights beyond behavioral performance. It is a suitable tool to disentangle the allocation of effort to listening versus memorizing speech.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2021. Vol. 42, no 4, p. 846-859
Keywords [en]
Listening effort, Memory, Pupillometry, Sentence final word identification and recall testand recall test
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-179946DOI: 10.1097/AUD.0000000000001002ISI: 000667445300009PubMedID: 33492008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85108967764OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-179946DiVA, id: diva2:1601517
Note

Funding Agencies: Oticon Foundation; DFG Cluster of Excellence "Hearing4all" [EXC 1077/11]

Available from: 2021-10-08 Created: 2021-10-08 Last updated: 2021-10-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Lunner, ThomasLyxell, Björn

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lunner, ThomasLyxell, BjörnNg, Elaine
By organisation
Disability ResearchFaculty of Arts and SciencesThe Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchDepartment of Behavioural Sciences and Learning
In the same journal
Ear and Hearing
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 118 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf