liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Addressing climate change with behavioral science: A global intervention tournament in 63 countries
Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2138-1968
Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.;Department of Cognition, Emotion, and Methods in Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Vienna 1010, Austria.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0043-9609
Craig Newmark Center for Journalism Ethics and Security, Columbia University, New York, NY 10018, USA.;Institute for Rebooting Social Media, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7590-3824
Department of Cognition, Emotion, and Methods in Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Vienna 1010, Austria.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4840-498X
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 2582024 (English)In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 10, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Effectively reducing climate change requires marked, global behavior change. However, it is unclear which strategies are most likely to motivate people to change their climate beliefs and behaviors. Here, we tested 11 expert-crowdsourced interventions on four climate mitigation outcomes: beliefs, policy support, information sharing intention, and an effortful tree-planting behavioral task. Across 59,440 participants from 63 countries, the interventions’ effectiveness was small, largely limited to nonclimate skeptics, and differed across outcomes: Beliefs were strengthened mostly by decreasing psychological distance (by 2.3%), policy support by writing a letter to a future-generation member (2.6%), information sharing by negative emotion induction (12.1%), and no intervention increased the more effortful behavior—several interventions even reduced tree planting. Last, the effects of each intervention differed depending on people’s initial climate beliefs. These findings suggest that the impact of behavioral climate interventions varies across audiences and target behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 2024. Vol. 10, no 6
National Category
Economics Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-201090DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.adj5778ISI: 001190871400011PubMedID: 38324680Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85184670116OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-201090DiVA, id: diva2:1839332
Note

Funding Agencies|Google Jigsaw grant; Swiss National Science Foundation [P400PS_190997]; Dutch Research Council [7934]; John Templeton Foundation [61378]; National council for Scientific and technological development grant; Swiss Federal Office of energy through the energy, economy, and Society program; Christ church college Research centre grant [Si/502093- 01]; National Research Foundation of Korea [NRF- 2020S1A3A2A02097375]; Kieskompas-election compass; National Agency of Research and Development; National Doctoral Scholarship [24210087]; Dutch Science Foundation (NWO) [Vi.Veni.201S.075]; Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) [453- 15- 005]; Foundation for Science and technology-Fct (Portuguese Ministry of Science, technology and higher education) [UidB/05380/2020]; Slovak Research and development Agency (APVV) [APVV- 21- 0114]; James Mcdonnell Foundation; Swedish Research council [2018- 01755]; Russian Federation Government [075- 15- 2021- 611]

Available from: 2024-02-20 Created: 2024-02-20 Last updated: 2024-05-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Koppel, LinaVästfjäll, DanielTinghög, Gustav

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Vlasceanu, MadalinaDoell, Kimberly C.Bak-Coleman, Joseph B.Todorova, BoryanaPatel, YashGoldwert, DaniellePronizius, EkaterinaVlasceanu, DenisaConstantino, SaraMorais, Michael J.Schumann, PhilippFang, KeAglioti, Salvatore MariaAlfano, MarkAlvarado-Yepez, Andy J.Andersen, AngélicaAnseel, FrederikAsadli, ChillarAzevedo, FlavioBélanger, Jocelyn J.Białek, MichałBialobrzeska, OlgaBlaya-Burgo, MichelleBleize, Daniëlle N. M.Boecker, LeaBoggio, Paulo S.Borau, SylvieBos, BjörnBouguettaya, AyoubBrauer, MarkusBrick, CameronBrik, TymofiiBrosch, TobiasBuchel, OndrejBuonauro, DanielButalia, RadhikaCarvacho, HéctorKoppel, LinaVästfjäll, DanielTinghög, Gustav
By organisation
EconomicsFaculty of Arts and SciencesPsychology
In the same journal
Science Advances
EconomicsPsychology (excluding Applied Psychology)Social Sciences Interdisciplinary

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 78 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf