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The Effects of Noise and Simulated Conductive Hearing Loss on Physiological Response Measures During Interactive Conversations
Oticon A S, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A S, Denmark. (Linnaeus Center HEAD)
Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 66, no 10, p. 4009-4024Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the effects of background noise and hearing attenuation associated with earplugs on three physiological measures, assumed to be markers of effort investment and arousal, during interactive communication. Method: Twelve pairs of older people (average age of 63.2 years) with ageadjusted normal hearing took part in a face-to-face communication to solve a Diapix task. Communication was held in different levels of babble noise (0, 60, and 70 dBA) and with two levels of hearing attenuation (0 and 25 dB) in quiet. The physiological measures obtained included pupil size, heart rate variability, and skin conductance. In addition, subjective ratings of perceived communication success, frustration, and effort were obtained. Results: Ratings of perceived success, frustration, and effort confirmed that communication was more difficult in noise and with approximately 25-dB hearing attenuation and suggested that the implemented levels of noise and hearing attenuation resulted in comparable communication difficulties. Background noise at 70 dBA and hearing attenuation both led to an initial increase in pupil size (associated with effort), but only the effect of the background noise was sustained throughout the conversation. The 25-dB hearing attenuation led to a significant decrease of the high-frequency power of heart rate variability and a significant increase of skin conductance level, measured as the average z value of the electrodermal activity amplitude. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that several physiological measures appear to be viable indicators of changing communication conditions, with pupillometry and cardiovascular as well as electrodermal measures potentially being markers of communication difficulty.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOC , 2023. Vol. 66, no 10, p. 4009-4024
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-201703DOI: 10.1044/2023_JSLHR-23-00063ISI: 001146442500013PubMedID: 37850684OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-201703DiVA, id: diva2:1845844
Note

Funding Agencies|Innovation Foundation [1045-00007B]

Available from: 2024-03-20 Created: 2024-03-20 Last updated: 2024-03-20

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