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Ghrelin decreases sensitivity to negative feedback and increases prediction-error related caudate activity in humans, a randomized controlled trial
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).ORCID iD: 0009-0009-0180-6923
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1012-7286
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7982-4659
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
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2024 (English)In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 49, p. 1042-1049Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The stomach-derived hormone ghrelin plays not only a role in feeding, starvation, and survival, but it has been suggested to also be involved in the stress response, in neuropsychiatric conditions, and in alcohol and drug use disorders. Mechanisms related to reward processing might mediate ghrelin's broader effects on complex behaviors, as indicated by animal studies and mostly correlative human studies. Here, using a within-subject double-blind placebo-controlled design with intravenous ghrelin infusion in healthy volunteers (n = 30), we tested whether ghrelin alters sensitivity to reward and punishment in a reward learning task. Parameters were derived from a computational model of participants' task behavior. The reversal learning task with monetary rewards was performed during functional brain imaging to investigate ghrelin effects on brain signals related to reward prediction errors. Compared to placebo, ghrelin decreased punishment sensitivity (t = -2.448, p = 0.021), while reward sensitivity was unaltered (t = 0.8, p = 0.43). We furthermore found increased prediction-error related activity in the dorsal striatum during ghrelin administration (region of interest analysis: t-values >= 4.21, p-values <= 0.044). Our results support a role for ghrelin in reward processing that extends beyond food-related rewards. Reduced sensitivity to negative outcomes and increased processing of prediction errors may be beneficial for food foraging when hungry but could also relate to increased risk taking and impulsivity in the broader context of addictive behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2024. Vol. 49, p. 1042-1049
National Category
Psychiatry Neurosciences Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-202021DOI: 10.1038/s41386-024-01821-6ISI: 001172407400001PubMedID: 38409282OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-202021DiVA, id: diva2:1848881
Funder
Marcus Wallenbergs Foundation for International Scientific Collaboration, 2014.0187Swedish Research Council, 2013-07434
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2013-07434]; Marcus and Marianne Wallenberg foundation [2014.0187]; NIH IRP (NIDA); NIH IRP (NIAAA); Linkoeping University

Available from: 2024-04-04 Created: 2024-04-04 Last updated: 2024-05-16

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Pietrzak, MichalYngve, AdamHamilton, Paul J.Asratian, AnnaGauffin, EmelieLöfberg, AndreasGustavson, SarahPersson, EmilJohansson Capusan, AndreaLeggio, LorenzoPerini, IreneTinghög, GustavHeilig, MarkusBöhme, Rebecca
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Center for Social and Affective NeuroscienceFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesPsykiatriska kliniken i LinköpingCenter for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV)Division of Cell BiologyEconomicsFaculty of Arts and Sciences
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