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Bringing the lived body to medical ethics education: learning to see the suffering other
Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Hälsa och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.ORCID-id: 0000-0002-2862-3731
2012 (Engelska)Ingår i: Reconceiving medical ethics / [ed] Christopher Cowley, London: Continuum, 2012, s. 44-55Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
Abstract [en]

Virtue ethical approaches, with their foci on the character of the moral subject, on motivations, emotions and relationships, can enable ethics in medicine and provide fuller ethical examinations and more context-sensitive and creative solutions than can principle-based or consequentialist reasoning alone. Such reasoning can explain the persistent interest with moral virtues in medicine. Virtue ethics is seen as a valuable alternative to other ways of grappling with moral dilemmas in medicine, where a number of principles have been applied to particular cases with some considerations of possible consequences of different actions (see Pellegrino 2001, Bolsin et al . 2005, Gardiner 2003, Thomasma 2000, Tong 1998). Though the latter frameworks give valuable ethical insights, they have their limits in terms of how different principles should be valued and weighted against each other. Virtue ethical approaches are commonly concerned with the subject becoming virtuous. This requires time and continuous practice. It involves habituation. In this regard, the development of virtues shares features with the development of practical skills. In both cases, we learn by doing. Despite the fact that the learning of practical skills is an interest for phenomenologists such as Maurice Merleau-Ponty (2006), surprisingly little dialogue has taken place between virtue ethics and phenomenological traditions. Such a dialogue will arise in this text. A phenomenological analysis can deepen our understanding of how the practical know-how of virtues can feed into the subject ’ s embodied existence and perception. It can throw new light on the debated phenomenon of moral perception. And it can matter for medical ethics education. A few previous studies have elaborated a phenomenology of virtue that examines what it is like to be a virtuous person (Annas 2008) or out lined a phenomenology of skill-acquisition where acting ethically is seen as a skill (Dreyfus and Dreyfus 2004). Such studies have contributed with insights as regards the role of moral know-how in moral development. They have not, however, examined bodily dimension of learning to act ethically and becoming virtuous, in any detail. This will be done here. My aim is to examine, phenomenologically, the role of the body when becoming virtuous and what incorporation of virtues-as-skills would mean for perception . This can further explain the phenomenon of moral perception, contribute to the discussion of alternative approaches to medical ethics and particularly so to the discussion of ethical competence and the learning of ethics in medical education. The text consists of five parts. I start by briefly outlining a virtue ethical approach to medical practice along the lines of Alasdair MacIntyre (1981) and Edmund Pellegrino (1995, 2001). In this reasoning, medicine is seen as a moral practice and an activity through which certain goods, that are internal to the practice, are reached. Virtues are defined in relation to the practice, as learned qualities that promote the achievement of the internal goods of the practice. This enables a discussion of what virtues health care professionals preferably should develop in order for them to achieve the internal goods of medicine. It also opens up a discussion of moral perception in medicine, and the second part contains a short discussion of moral perception and the benefit of seeing virtues-as-skills. The third part turns to phenomenology of the body and presents some core concepts in this perspective. In the fourth part, I examine the role of the body when becoming virtuous and the fifth part examines what it would mean to say that virtues-as-skills should be incorporated, for moral perception.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
London: Continuum, 2012. s. 44-55
Nyckelord [en]
Medical ethics, Patient Rights -- ethics, Philosophy, Medical
Nyckelord [sv]
Medicinsk etik
Nationell ämneskategori
Filosofi, etik och religion
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77952Libris ID: n35nx3hzl2lwnvr9ISBN: 9781441123381 (tryckt)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-77952DiVA, id: diva2:530182
Tillgänglig från: 2012-06-01 Skapad: 2012-06-01 Senast uppdaterad: 2022-05-16Bibliografiskt granskad

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Zeiler, Kristin

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Totalt: 249 träffar
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