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Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blend as Photonic Probe of Biomembrane Organization
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Chemistry I—Applied Functional Polymers University of Bayreuth Bayreuth, Germany.
Chemistry I—Applied Functional Polymers University of Bayreuth Bayreuth, Germany.
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
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2016 (English)In: ChemistrySelect, ISSN 2365-6549, Vol. 1, no 14, 4340-4344 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the following report, a conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) blend has been introduced for the first time as a fluorescent probe of membrane organization. Insertion of the blend into the lipid double layer has been rendered possible through formation of a hydrophobic complex by counterion exchange. Changes in membrane physical state from liquid-disordered (Ldis) to liquid-ordered (Lord), and to solid-ordered (Sord) result in red shifts of blend excitation (up to Δλex=+90 nm) and emission (up to Δλnm=+37 nm) maxima attributable to backbone planarization of CPEs. We found that blend stoichiometry can be adjusted to attain the best interplay among single polyelectrolytes properties, such as sensitivity and luminescence. The resulting probes therefore allow a bimodal detection of membrane physical state: changes in absorption permit a direct visualization of membrane organization, while variations in emission spectra demonstrate that CPE-blends are a promising probes that can be used for imaging applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016. Vol. 1, no 14, 4340-4344 p.
Keyword [en]
Conjugated Polyelectrolytes, Fluorescent Probes, Liposomes, Membrane Probes, Polyelectrolytes blend
National Category
Biomaterials Science Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132729DOI: 10.1002/slct.201600920OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-132729DiVA: diva2:1048474
Available from: 2016-11-21 Created: 2016-11-21 Last updated: 2016-11-21Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Self-doped Conjugated Polyelectrolytes for Bioelectronics Applications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-doped Conjugated Polyelectrolytes for Bioelectronics Applications
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) are a class of conducting polymers constituted of a π-conjugated backbone and charged side groups. The ionic groups provide the counterions needed to balance the charged species formed in the CPEs backbones upon oxidation. As a result, addition of external counterions is not required, and the CPEs can be defined as selfdoped. The combination of their unique optical and electrical properties render them the perfect candidates for optoelectronic applications. Additionally, their “soft” nature provide for the mechanical compatibility necessary to interface with biological systems, rendering them promising materials for bioelectronics applications. CPEs solubility, aggregation state, and optoelectronic properties can be easily tuned by different means, such as blending or interaction with oppositely charged species (such as surfactants), in order to produce materials with the desired properties. In this thesis both the strategies have been explored to produce new functional materials that can be deposited to form a thin film and,  therefore, used as an active layer in organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs). Microstructure formation of the films as well as influence on devices operation and performance have been investigated. We also show that these methods can be exploited to produce materials whose uniquecombination of self-doping ability and hydrophobicity allows incorporation into the phospholipid double layer of biomembranes, while retaining their properties. As a result, self-doped CPEs can be used both as sensing elements to probe the physical state of biomembranes, and as functional ones providing them with new functionalities, such as electrical conductivity. Integration of conductive electronic biomembranes into OECTs devices has brought us one step forward on the interface of manmade technologies with biological systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016. 68 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1802
National Category
Materials Chemistry Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials Inorganic Chemistry Other Materials Engineering Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132731 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-132731 (DOI)9789176856451 (Print) (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-12-15, Plank, Fysikhuset, Campus Valla, Linköping, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-11-21 Created: 2016-11-21 Last updated: 2016-11-21Bibliographically approved

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Zeglio, EricaGabrielsson, RogerSolin, NiclasInganäs, Olle
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