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Digital Health - The Biochemical Interface: 2016 Datta Medal Lecture
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1815-9699
2016 (English)In: 41st FEBS Congress, FEBS , 2016Conference paper, Abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Healthcare spending is growing unsustainably; the USA spends 17.1% of its GDP on healthcare and Sweden 9.7%. Too often, new science implies increased expenditure, but new ideas can both decrease cost and increase effectiveness. Wearable sensors offer a trillion USD market to improve health, but the devices delivered to date havefocussed on relatively easy targets using physical sensors. The real gain will come from monitoring of biochemical parameters that are harder to access in a convenient format. Enhanced awareness of the value of data will spur individuals to acquire and exploit more information about their individual biochemistries, while increasinglysophisticated decision support systems will offer improved diagnostic accuracy and faster information flow. Further drivers are evidence-based reimbursement of treatment costs and the now widely recognised opportunities offered by personalised medicine. Couple all this with the mobility facilitated by telecommunications, and aradical decentralisation and restructuring of national healthcare services, together with the industries serving them, could finally be on the horizon. Biosensors have already proved an enormous success, but far from being a mature technology, we are just on the cusp of a new era. While there are caveats about the usefulness ofsome frequent measurements, new technology is emerging that fuses the mass production of electronics with that that of biochemical assays to yield a plethora of new analytical capabilities. Examples include completely printable diagnostic instruments that can adorn packaging or be worn like a plaster, to contact lensesthat can both sense disease and administer front-line treatment. Advanced functional hybrid materials are enabling the design of reversible affinity sensors and compartmentalised switchable biochemical cascades, while fundamental studies on single-molecule electrochemistry point the way towards new catalyst designs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FEBS , 2016.
National Category
Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133673OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-133673DiVA: diva2:1062439
Conference
41st FEBS Congress, 3-8 September 2016, Ephesus-Kusadasi, Turkey
Available from: 2017-01-05 Created: 2017-01-05 Last updated: 2017-01-20Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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