liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Long-term outcomes and predictors of internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders.
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. e, Division of PsychDepartment of Clinical Neurosciencology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. (Internet, health and clinical psychology research group)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4753-6745
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 90, 67-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the long-term outcomes of internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for children with anxiety disorders, and potential pre-treatment predictors of treatment outcome.

METHOD: The sample included eighty-four children (8-12 years old) with anxiety disorders, from both a treatment group and a waitlist control (after participants had crossed over to treatment) of a previous randomized controlled study. Participants were assessed at post-treatment and three- and twelve-months after treatment using a semi-structured interview and parent ratings. Pre-treatment data were used to investigate predictors of treatment outcome at three-month follow-up.

RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analysis showed that treatment gains were maintained at twelve-month follow-up, including clinician rated severity of the principal anxiety disorder, parent rated anxiety symptoms and global functioning, with mainly large effect sizes (Cohen's d = 0.63-2.35). Completer analyses showed that suspected autism spectrum disorder was associated with less change in symptom severity. No other pre-treatment measures significantly predicted treatment outcome.

CONCLUSION: This study suggests that internet-delivered CBT can have long-term beneficial effects for children with anxiety disorders. Predictors of treatment outcome need to be evaluated further.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01533402.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 90, 67-75 p.
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-134535DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2016.12.008ISI: 000393248800008PubMedID: 28012300OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-134535DiVA: diva2:1074252
Note

Funding agencies: Stockholm County Council; Karolinska Institutet [ALF 20110278, 20120070]; Claes Groschinsky foundation [SF11 147]

Available from: 2017-02-15 Created: 2017-02-15 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, Gerhard
By organisation
PsychologyFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Behaviour Research and Therapy
Applied Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 256 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf