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Access to and use of everyday technology among older people: An occupational justice issue – but for whom?
Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden / Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 23, no 3, 382-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research into older people’s use of remote controls, mobile phones, digital home appliances, and computerized communication systems reveals that many have difficulty accessing and using these everyday technologies. By using occupational justice theory as a lens onto this technological development, we argue in this commentary that critical analysis of the findings from an occupational perspective reveals systematic injustices that disadvantage certain sectors of the older population. In particular we propose that, contrary to what might be expected, diagnosis or disability is not the sole marker for a vulnerable population at high risk of occupational injustices. Rather, the empirical findings support that other aspects (e.g., economic, educational) may also be influencing both everyday technology access and use among the older population. In light of these concerns, we argue that (a) occupation-centred outcome measures are needed to target everyday technology populations at risk of occupational injustices, and (b) future studies evaluating the access and use of everyday technology among older people must also monitor and target socio-demographic diversities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016. Vol. 23, no 3, 382-388 p.
National Category
Occupational Therapy Human Aspects of ICT Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-135283DOI: 10.1080/14427591.2016.1151457OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-135283DiVA: diva2:1080387
Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2017-03-10Bibliographically approved

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Öhman, Annika
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Division of Occupational TherapyNISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later LifeFaculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
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Occupational TherapyHuman Aspects of ICTInformation Systems, Social aspects

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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