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A good death from the perspective of palliative cancer patients
Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
2017 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 25, no 3, 933-939 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although previous research has indicated some recurrent themes and similarities between what patients from different cultures regard as a good death, the concept is complex and there is lack of studies from the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to explore the perception of a good death in dying cancer patients in Sweden. Interviews were conducted with 66 adult patients with cancer in the palliative phase who were recruited from home care and hospital care. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Participants viewed death as a process. A good death was associated with living with the prospect of imminent death, preparing for death and dying comfortably, e.g., dying quickly, with independence, with minimised suffering and with social relations intact. Some were comforted by their belief that death is predetermined. Others felt uneasy as they considered death an end to existence. Past experiences of the death of others influenced participants views of a good death. Healthcare staff caring for palliative patients should consider asking them to describe what they consider a good death in order to identify goals for care. Exploring patients personal experience of death and dying can help address their fears as death approaches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER , 2017. Vol. 25, no 3, 933-939 p.
Keyword [en]
Palliative care; Qualitative research; Good death; Attitude to death; End-of-life care; Quality of death
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-135716DOI: 10.1007/s00520-016-3483-9ISI: 000393740400028PubMedID: 27837324OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-135716DiVA: diva2:1082778
Available from: 2017-03-17 Created: 2017-03-17 Last updated: 2017-03-17

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Kastbom, LisaMilberg, AnnaKarlsson, Marit
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Primary Health Care in Central CountyDepartment of Advanced Home Care in LinköpingDepartment of Medical and Health SciencesFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDivision of Nursing ScienceDepartment of Advanced Home Care in NorrköpingDivision of Neuro and Inflammation Science
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Supportive Care in Cancer
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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