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Food webs: ordering species according to body size yields high degree of intervality
Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, United States.
Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, United States.
Institute for Hydrobiologie and Fisheries Science, University Hamburg, Germany.
Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, United States; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, United States.
2011 (English)In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, ISSN 0022-5193, E-ISSN 1095-8541, Vol. 271, no 1, 106-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food webs, the networks describing "who eats whom" in an ecosystem, are nearly interval, i.e. there is a way to order the species so that almost all the resources of each consumer are adjacent in the ordering. This feature has important consequences, as it means that the structure of food webs can be described using a single (or few) species' traits. Moreover, exploiting the quasi-intervality found in empirical webs can help build better models for food web structure. Here we investigate which species trait is a good proxy for ordering the species to produce quasi-interval orderings. We find that body size produces a significant degree of intervality in almost all food webs analyzed, although it does not match the maximum intervality for the networks. There is also a great variability between webs. Other orderings based on trophic levels produce a lower level of intervality. Finally, we extend the concept of intervality from predator-centered (in which resources are in intervals) to prey-centered (in which consumers are in intervals). In this case as well we find that body size yields a significant, but not maximal, level of intervality. These results show that body size is an important, although not perfect, trait that shapes species interactions in food webs. This has important implications for the formulation of simple models used to construct realistic representations of food webs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011. Vol. 271, no 1, 106-113 p.
Keyword [en]
Ecological networks, Food web structure, Niche dimension, Intervality, Body size
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136457DOI: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2010.11.045ISI: 000286492100011PubMedID: 21144853ScopusID: 2-s2.0-78650594807OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-136457DiVA: diva2:1087994
Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2017-04-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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