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School Staff’s Social Representation of Inclusion of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Asperger)
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
Malmö University, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. (Psykologi)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5025-9975
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Örebro University, Sweden.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Education & Social Policy, ISSN 2375-0782, Vol. 3, no 5, 82-96 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current study examined and compared the social representations (SR) concerning the inclusion of students with Asperser diagnosis (AS) among principals, school health professionals, and teachers. Swedish school staff were invited to anonymously answer a web-based questionnaire (N=229). An association task was conducted to obtain data on principals, school health professionals and teachers’ of inclusion of students with AS. The content and structure of the SRs were explored by using the theoretical framework of social representation theory. Our results suggest that principals were mainly concerned with the organization and structural level of inclusion. School health professionals emphasized educational strategies, structure and routines and, students’ needs and their individual potentials whereas teachers refer to their own interaction as the most important aspect and more often than other staff referred to a burden. Social representation methodology offers unique opportunities for research as well as for applications aiming to promote inclusion. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 3, no 5, 82-96 p.
Keyword [en]
inclusion, school staff, autism spectrum disorder, Asperger diagnosis, social representations, social representation theory
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137299OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-137299DiVA: diva2:1094750
Available from: 2017-05-10 Created: 2017-05-10 Last updated: 2017-07-13Bibliographically approved

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Linton, Ann-CharlotteHeimann, Mikael
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
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  • sv-SE
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Output format
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