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Playing number board games supports 5-year-old children's early mathematical development
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Mathematical Behavior, ISSN 0732-3123, E-ISSN 1873-8028, Vol. 43, 134-147 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study examined effects of playing number games (linear number board game, circular number board game, and nonlinear numerical activities) on the development of number knowledge and early arithmetic. A passive control group was also included in the design. 114 5-year-old preschool children participated. Four tasks (number line estimation, counting, naming Arabic numbers, and arithmetic calculation) were used as dependent measures. Children assigned to an intervention participated in six 10-min sessions during a period of three weeks. Children playing the linear number board game improved their performance on the number line estimation task, while children playing the other games did not. Furthermore, children playing the linear number board game showed a substantial enhancement of their calculation performance. The positive effects of playing linear number board games support the representational mapping hypothesis. The finding concerning calculation provides support to the assumption that a linear representation is important for early arithmetical learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 43, 134-147 p.
Keyword [en]
Linear number board games, Intervention, Preschoolers, Number line estimation, Arithmetic
National Category
Learning Mathematics Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137476DOI: 10.1016/j.jmathb.2016.07.003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-137476DiVA: diva2:1096118
Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2017-06-02Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Children’s early mathematics learning and development: Number game interventions and number line estimations
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children’s early mathematics learning and development: Number game interventions and number line estimations
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Barns tidiga lärande och utveckling i matematik : Numeriska spelinterventioner och skattningar av tal på tallinjer
Abstract [en]

Children’s early mathematics learning and development have become a topic of increasing interest over the past decade since early mathematical knowledge and skills have been shown to be a strong predictor of later mathematics performance. Understanding how children develop mathematical knowledge and skills and how they can be supported in their early learning could thus prove to be a vital component in promoting learning of more formal mathematics.

In light of the above, with this thesis I sought to contribute to an increased understanding of children’s early mathematics learning and development by examining effects of playing different number games on children’s number knowledge and skills, and by investigating children’s representations of numbers on number line tasks.

Two number game intervention studies were performed, and effects of three different number game conditions (linear number, circular number and nonlinear number) were investigated by examining 5- and 6-year-old children’s pre- and posttest performance on different numerical tasks. The findings indicate that playing number games in general support children’s development of number knowledge and skills, where the specific learning outcomes are affected differently depending on the type of number game utilized.

To elucidate children’s representations of numbers, their performance on two different  umber line tasks have been analyzed using a latent class modeling approach. The results reveal that there is a heterogeneity in 5- and 6-year-old children’s number line estimations and subgroups of children showing different estimation patterns were distinguished. In addition, it is shown that children’s number line estimations can be associated to their number knowledge as well as to task specific aspects.

The findings presented in this thesis contribute to the discussion of the value of selecting game activities in a conscious way to support children’s early mathematics learning and development. They also add to the discussion regarding the number line task and how children’s number line estimations can be analyzed and interpreted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017. 92 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Behavioural Science, ISSN 1654-2029 ; 199
Keyword
mathematics learning and development; number knowledge and skills; intervention; number games; number line estimation; representations of number, lärande och utveckling i matematik; numeriska kunskaper och färdigheter; intervention; numeriska spel; skattningar av tal på tallinjer; representationer av tal.
National Category
Learning Mathematics Pedagogy Didactics Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137477 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-137477 (DOI)9789176855171 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-06-16, I:101, Hus I, Campus Valla, Linöping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2017-06-21Bibliographically approved

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Gustafson, StefanSamuelsson, JoakimTräff, Ulf

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