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Transcending the human/non-human divide: the geo-politics and body-politics of being and perception, and decolonial art.
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2017 (English)In: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 22, no 2, 25-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article focuses on the analysis of the geo-politics and body-politics of being, and perception as the key concepts in the decolonial option grounded in the spatiality and corporeality of our cognitive and perceptive mechanisms. Revived spatiality refers in this case not only to a physical space that we inhabit but also to our bodies as specific spatial entities – the privileged white male bodies or the damned, non-white, dehumanized and often gendered and sexualized bodies from the underside of modernity. The article presents a decolonial interpretation of the human/non-human binary aimed at rethinking the fundamental modern/colonial division into anthroposand humanitas and the subsequent animalization of large human groups. The main questions are then what does it mean to be animalized by and in modernity and what ways out are possible, desired and attainable for the dehumanized others? The main goal of the article is to further question liberal Western humanism from a decolonial perspective, without yet dropping this concept altogether, and considering instead another humanism model suggested by Sylvia Wynter. Contemporary critical anti-humanist and “other humanism” theories often find a much more accurate and immediate realization through artistic metaphors and activist art projects than traditional theory, problematizing the border between the human and the animal, the man-made and the natural, the individual and the communal. Therefore, the article dwells at some length on one such project balancing between art and critical anthropology – the works of the Northern Caucasus decolonial artist Taus Makhacheva.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon: Routledge, 2017. Vol. 22, no 2, 25-37 p.
Keyword [en]
geo-politics of knowledge, body-politics of perception, decolonial art, modernity/coloniality, human/non-human division, humanism of the other, the affective turn
National Category
Humanities and the Arts History of Ideas Performing Arts Gender Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137485DOI: 10.1080/0969725X.2017.1322816ISI: 000401551100004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-137485DiVA: diva2:1096196
Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2017-06-13Bibliographically approved

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Tlostanova, Madina
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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More styles
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