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Childhood apraxia of speech: A survey of praxis and typical speech characteristics
Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2208-0630
2017 (English)In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 42, no 2, 84-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate current knowledge of the diagnosis childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) in Sweden and compare speech characteristics and symptoms to those of earlier survey findings in mainly English-speakers. Method: In a web-based questionnaire 178 Swedish speech-language pathologists (SLPs) anonymously answered questions about their perception of typical speech characteristics for CAS. They graded own assessment skills and estimated clinical occurrence. Results: The seven top speech characteristics reported as typical for children with CAS were: inconsistent speech production (85%), sequencing difficulties (71%), oro-motor deficits (63%), vowel errors (62%), voicing errors (61%), consonant cluster deletions (54%), and prosodic disturbance (53%). Motor-programming deficits described as lack of automatization of speech movements were perceived by 82%. All listed characteristics were consistent with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) consensus-based features, Strands 10-point checklist, and the diagnostic model proposed by Ozanne. The mode for clinical occurrence was 5%. Number of suspected cases of CAS in the clinical caseload was approximately one new patient/year and SLP. Conclusions: The results support and add to findings from studies of CAS in English-speaking children with similar speech characteristics regarded as typical. Possibly, these findings could contribute to cross-linguistic consensus on CAS characteristics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD , 2017. Vol. 42, no 2, 84-92 p.
Keyword [en]
Assessment; clinical occurrence; consensus; global speech characteristics; inconsistent speech production; self-rating; speech-language pathologist; speech sound disorders
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137874DOI: 10.1080/14015439.2016.1185147ISI: 000400408100004PubMedID: 27241138OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-137874DiVA: diva2:1105025
Available from: 2017-06-02 Created: 2017-06-02 Last updated: 2017-06-02

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Mcallister, Anita
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Division of Neuro and Inflammation ScienceDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology in LinköpingFaculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
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