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Increased Cancer Incidence in the Local Population Around Metal-Contaminated Glassworks Sites
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
Linneaus University, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8234-5461
2017 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 59, no 5, E84-E90 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine mortality causes and cancer incidence in a population cohort that have resided in close proximity to highly metal-contaminated sources, characterized by contamination of, in particular, arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb). Methods: Data from Swedish registers were used to calculate standardized mortality and cancer incidence ratios. An attempt to relate cancer incidence to metal contamination levels was made. Results: Significantly elevated cancer incidences were observed for overall malignant cancers in both genders, cancer in the digestive system, including colon, rectum, and pancreas, and cancers in prostate among men. Dose-response relationships between Cd and Pb levels in soil and cancer risks were found. Conclusions: Cancer observations made, together with previous studies of metal uptake in local vegetables, may imply that exposure to local residents have occurred primarily via oral intake of locally produced foodstuffs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS , 2017. Vol. 59, no 5, E84-E90 p.
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-138919DOI: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001003ISI: 000403079500002PubMedID: 28437293OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-138919DiVA: diva2:1115835
Note

Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University

Available from: 2017-06-27 Created: 2017-06-27 Last updated: 2017-10-02

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