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Complementarity between medical geneticists and genetic counsellors: its added value in genetic services in Europe
University of Porto, Portugal.
University of Pompeu Fabra, Spain; Institute Salud Carlos III, Spain.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Synlab Genet, Switzerland.
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 25, no 8, 918-923 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clinical genetic services have progressed significantly the last few decades. This has led to the need for non-medical health-care professionals working as genetic counsellors in Europe and worldwide. However, there is no unified approach to genetic counsellors role in health-care services in Europe, as in most countries the profession is still emerging and the educational backgrounds diverge noticeably, within and between countries. This qualitative study aims to describe the potential added value of genetic counsellors in clinical genetics teams and to explore their tasks and responsibilities in different European countries. A total of 143 participants providing genetic counselling in Europe at the time of the survey responded. The results show differences in activities of genetic counsellors, although there is a wide range of roles, which are similar. The ability to establish a quality relationship with consultands was frequently mentioned as one of the strengths of genetic counsellors, as well as a patient-centred approach. It is believed that genetic counsellors add a more holistic approach of psychosocial and familial dimensions of genetic concerns to the multidisciplinary teams. This study provides examples of successful integration of genetic counsellors in teams, as complementariness with medical geneticist became clear in several cases. Although the added value of genetic counsellors was manifested, professional recognition of genetic counsellors across Europe is still needed in order to support the quality of patients care and safety of practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP , 2017. Vol. 25, no 8, 918-923 p.
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139534DOI: 10.1038/ejhg.2017.76ISI: 000405480900004PubMedID: 28513616OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-139534DiVA: diva2:1130168
Note

Funding Agencies|Department of Clinical Genetics, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

Available from: 2017-08-08 Created: 2017-08-08 Last updated: 2017-08-08

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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