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Insights from introducing natural selection to novices using animations of antibiotic resistance
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (Visual Learning and Communication)
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (Visual Learning and Communication)
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (Visual Learning and Communication)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1032-2145
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (Visual Learning and Communication)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4694-5611
2017 (English)In: Journal of Biological Education, ISSN 0021-9266, E-ISSN 2157-6009, 1-17 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Antibiotic resistance is typically used to justify education about evolution, as evolutionary reasoning improves our understanding of causes of resistance and possible countermeasures. It has also been promoted as a useful context for teaching natural selection, because its potency as a selection factor, in combination with the very short generation times of bacteria, allows observation of rapid selection. It is also amenable to animations, which have potential for promoting conceptual inferences. Thus, we have explored the potential benefits of introducing antibiotic resistance as a first example of natural selection, in animations, to novice pupils (aged 13–14 years). We created a series of animations that pupils interacted with in groups of 3–5 (total n = 32). Data were collected at individual (pre-/post- test) and group (collaborative group questions) levels. In addition, the exercise was video-recorded and the full transcripts were analysed inductively. The results show that most of the pupils successfully applied basic evolutionary reasoning to predict antibiotic resistance development in tasks during and after the exercise, suggesting that this may be an effective approach. Pedagogical contributions include the identification of certain characteristics of the bacterial context for evolution teaching, including common misunderstandings, and factors to consider when designing animations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017. 1-17 p.
Keyword [en]
natural selection, antibiotic resistance, animation, mutations, lower secondary education
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140024DOI: 10.1080/00219266.2017.1368687OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-140024DiVA: diva2:1136365
Projects
EvoVis
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-5344
Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2017-09-15Bibliographically approved

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The full text will be freely available from 2019-02-22 09:49
Available from 2019-02-22 09:49

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Bohlin, GustavGöransson, Andreas C.Höst, GunnarTibell, Lena
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