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Evolving germs – Introducing novice pupils to the evolution of bacterial resistance to antibiotics
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (Visual Learning and Communication)
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (Visual Learning and Communication)
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (Visual Learning and Communication)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1032-2145
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (Visual Learning and Communication)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4694-5611
2017 (English)Conference paper, Presentation (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

There is a dual relationship between antibiotic resistance and biological evolution. Antibiotic resistance is typically used as a motivation for why we need an efficient evolution education given that evolutionary reasoning improves our understanding of causes and suggested countermeasures. On the other hand, antibiotic resistance has also been suggested as a useful context in which evolution can be taught, based primarily but not solely on the quick generation times of bacteria. In the present study, we explore the potential benefits with using antibiotic resistance as an example when introducing evolution to novice pupils (aged 13-14). We created a series of animations that pupils interacted with in groups of 3-5 (total n=32). Data was collected on both individual (pre-posttest) and group (collaborative group questions) level. In addition, the exercise was video-taped and the full transcripts were analyzed inductively. The results show that a majority of the pupils succeeded in applying basic evolutionary reasoning to make predictions on antibiotic resistance during and after the exercise, suggesting that this may be a successful approach. Cautions to be aware of include pupils’ use of teleological and antropomorphic reasoning, especially in discussions on submicroscopical phenomena such as genetic processes. Implications for teaching include both lessons from the design of animations as well as the identification of common misunderstandings. The analysis also identifies and points toward several possible future research endeavours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keyword [en]
biology, computer supported collaborative learning, peer interaction
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140026OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-140026DiVA: diva2:1136374
Conference
ESERA 2017, 12th Conference of the European Science Education Research Association. 21-25 Aug. Dublin, Ireland.
Projects
EvoVis
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-5344
Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2017-09-18

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Bohlin, GustavGöransson, Andreas C.Höst, Gunnar E.Tibell, Lena A. E.
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CiteExportLink to record
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