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Technology and Children’s Literature
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5721-7719
2017 (English)In: Handbook of Technology Education / [ed] Marc J. de Vries, Springer Publishing Company, 2017, 1-17 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The technology that mediates our lives today is complex. If we are to understand our modern technological world, technology education needs to place more emphasis on discussions and reflections about technology. A starting point for this chapter is that children’s literature can be understood as a mediator of views and values about technology, which makes it an interesting subject matter for technology education. Children’s fiction places technology in a context and could therefore serve as a pedagogical tool for broadening and expanding technology education. This chapter is an exploration of different views of technology found within a selection of children’s books: an anti-consumeristic view of technology, technology as a servant to humans, a nostalgic view of technology, and technology as a vehicle for adventure. The books are all examples of stories which depict technology itself but also issues and problems relevant to the field of technology education. In general, the books present technology in a diverse way, and the messages in the stories reveal its multifaceted nature. This chapter concludes that fictional stories can make it possible to problematize the nature of technology in ways that textbooks seldom can. Children’s fiction could therefore serve as a platform for open-ended enquiries and dialogues about the nature of technology and the effects of technology on individuals, society, and nature in the past and the present.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2017. 1-17 p.
Series
Springer International Handbooks of Education, ISSN 2197-1951
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140027DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-38889-2_66-1ISBN: 9783319388892 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-140027DiVA: diva2:1136392
Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2017-08-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf