liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Interaction and common ground in dementia: Communication across linguistic and cultural diversity in a residential dementia care setting
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2017 (English)In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, E-ISSN 1461-7196, Vol. 21, no 5, 538-554 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research concerning bilingual people with a dementia disease has mainly focused on the importance of sharing a spoken language with caregivers. While acknowledging this, this article addresses the multidimensional character of communication and interaction. As using spoken language is made difficult as a consequence of the dementia disease, this multidimensionality becomes particularly important. The article is based on a qualitative analysis of ethnographic fieldwork at a dementia care facility. It presents ethnographic examples of different communicative forms, with particular focus on bilingual interactions. Interaction is understood as a collective and collaborative activity. The text finds that a shared spoken language is advantageous, but is not the only source of, nor a guarantee for, creating common ground and understanding. Communicative resources other than spoken language are for example body language, embodiment, artefacts and time. Furthermore, forms of communication are not static but develop, change and are created over time. Ability to communicate is thus not something that one has or has not, but is situationally and collaboratively created. To facilitate this, time and familiarity are central resources, and the results indicate the importance of continuity in interpersonal relations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD , 2017. Vol. 21, no 5, 538-554 p.
Keyword [en]
bilingualism; communication; dementia; interaction; interpersonal continuity; person-centred care
National Category
Communication Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140040DOI: 10.1177/1363459316677626ISI: 000407645700005PubMedID: 27895101OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-140040DiVA: diva2:1136706
Note

Funding Agencies|Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation (RJ) [M-10-0187:1]

Available from: 2017-08-29 Created: 2017-08-29 Last updated: 2017-08-29

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Strandroos, LisaAntelius, Eleonor
By organisation
NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later LifeFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Health
Communication Studies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 57 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf