liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Better to Exploit than to Neglect? International Clinical Research and the Non-Worseness Claim
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3071-9609
2017 (English)In: Journal of Applied Philosophy, ISSN 0264-3758, E-ISSN 1468-5930, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 474-488Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clinical research is increasingly offshored to developing countries, a practice that has generated considerable controversy. It has recently been argued that the prevailing ethical norms governing such research are deeply puzzling. On the one hand, sponsors are not required to offshore trials, even when participants in developing countries would benefit considerably from these trials. On the other hand, if sponsors do offshore, they are required not to exploit participants, even when the latter would benefit from and consent to exploitation. How, it is asked, can it be worse to exploit the global poor than to neglect them when exploitation is voluntary and makes them better off? The present article seeks to respond to this challenge. I argue that mutually beneficial and voluntary exploitation can be worse than neglect when as is typically true of exploitative international research it takes advantage of unjust background conditions. This is because, in such cases, exploitation overlaps with another, less familiar wrong: complicity in injustice. Recognising complicity as a distinct wrong should make us judge exchanges arising from background injustice more harshly than we typically do, in research and elsewhere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2017. Vol. 34, no 4, p. 474-488
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140522DOI: 10.1111/japp.12153ISI: 000407248900002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-140522DiVA, id: diva2:1140106
Available from: 2017-09-11 Created: 2017-09-11 Last updated: 2017-10-05

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(211 kB)32 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 211 kBChecksum SHA-512
ba73ead4b1925ba71e3e5abcf3ebe4da97b2bba27487bd9afdcf1841e3747f3260053dbe59df4e30fbaf6462ecc54c9f4d080de15f58a18c87741b978224585a
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Malmqvist, Erik
By organisation
Technology and Social ChangeFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Journal of Applied Philosophy
Philosophy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 32 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 63 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf