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Risk behaviour determinants among people who inject drugs in Stockholm, Sweden over a 10-year period, from 2002 to 2012
Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dependency in Linköping.
Swedish Prison and Probat Serv, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Harm Reduction Journal, ISSN 1477-7517, E-ISSN 1477-7517, Vol. 14, article id 57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: People who inject drugs (PWID) frequently engage in injection risk behaviours exposing them to blood-borne infections. Understanding the underlying causes that drive various types and levels of risk behaviours is important to better target preventive interventions. Methods: A total of 2150 PWID in Swedish remand prisons were interviewed between 2002 and 2012. Questions on socio-demographic and drug-related variables were asked in relation to the following outcomes: Having shared injection drug solution and having lent out or having received already used drug injection equipment within a 12 month recall period. Results: Women shared solutions more than men (odds ratio (OR) 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03; 2.21). Those who had begun to inject drugs before age 17 had a higher risk (OR 1.43, 95% CI 0.99; 2.08) of having received used equipment compared to 17-19 year olds. Amphetamine-injectors shared solutions more than those injecting heroin (OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.64; 3.62). A housing contract lowered the risk of unsafe injection by 37-59% compared to being homeless. Conclusions: Women, early drug debut, amphetamine users and homeless people had a significantly higher level of injection risk behaviour and need special attention and tailored prevention to successfully combat hepatitis C and HIV transmission among PWID.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD , 2017. Vol. 14, article id 57
Keywords [en]
Determinants; HIV; Hepatitis C; Injection risk behaviour; People who inject drugs
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140511DOI: 10.1186/s12954-017-0184-8ISI: 000407972500003PubMedID: 28814336OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-140511DiVA, id: diva2:1140130
Note

Funding Agencies|Public Health Agency

Available from: 2017-09-11 Created: 2017-09-11 Last updated: 2017-10-06

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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