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Exorcising Grice's ghost: an empirical approach to studying intentional communication in animals.
Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.; Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
Department of Anthropology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; Centre of Excellence in Intersubjectivity in Interaction, Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
School of Psychology and Neuroscience, St Andrews University, St Andrews, UK.
School of Psychology, University of York, York, U.K..
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2016 (English)In: Biological Reviews, ISSN 1464-7931, E-ISSN 1469-185X, Vol. 92, no 3, 1427-1433 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Language's intentional nature has been highlighted as a crucial feature distinguishing it from other communication systems. Specifically, language is often thought to depend on highly structured intentional action and mutual mindreading by a communicator and recipient. Whilst similar abilities in animals can shed light on the evolution of intentionality, they remain challenging to detect unambiguously. We revisit animal intentional communication and suggest that progress in identifying analogous capacities has been complicated by (i) the assumption that intentional (that is, voluntary) production of communicative acts requires mental-state attribution, and (ii) variation in approaches investigating communication across sensory modalities. To move forward, we argue that a framework fusing research across modalities and species is required. We structure intentional communication into a series of requirements, each of which can be operationalised, investigated empirically, and must be met for purposive, intentionally communicative acts to be demonstrated. Our unified approach helps elucidate the distribution of animal intentional communication and subsequently serves to clarify what is meant by attributions of intentional communication in animals and humans.less thanbr /greater than (© 2016 Cambridge Philosophical Society.)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2016. Vol. 92, no 3, 1427-1433 p.
Keyword [en]
communication, language evolution, intentionality, vocalisation, gesture
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140833DOI: 10.1111/brv.12289ISI: 000404744100010PubMedID: 27480784Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84994399212OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-140833DiVA: diva2:1140816
Available from: 2017-09-13 Created: 2017-09-13 Last updated: 2017-09-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
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