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Performance using low-cost gaze-control for simulated flight tasks
Saab AB.
Linköping University.
Linköping University.
Linköping University.
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe Chapter 2016 Annual Conference: Human Factors and User Needs in Transport, Control, and the Workplace / [ed] Dick de Waard, Antonella Toffetti, Rebecca Wiczorek, Andreas Sonderegger, Stefan Röttger, Petr Bouchner, Thomas Franke, Stephen Fairclough, Matthijs Noordzij, and Karel Brookhuis, 2016, 201-210 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the current study, interaction using gaze control was compared to computer mouse using the MATB-II (Multi-Attribute Task Battery) environment. The study had two aims; the first was to explore the utility of low-cost technologies in a rapid prototyping and testing environment for aviation. The second aim was to use such an environment to compare a novel interaction device (a low-cost gaze control device) to a familiar interaction device (computer mouse). Method: Thirty participants performed two scenarios with each interaction device. The software MATB-II provided simulated flight tasks and recorded performance. Mental workload was assessed by the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) questionnaire after each scenario. Results: The results showed that gaze control resulted in significantly higher overall mental workload than computer mouse. Performance was better with mouse in two of the four tasks. Conclusions: Concerning the first aim, the study demonstrated the value of low-cost technology for initial user testing before using more expensive high-fidelity environments. Concerning the second aim, the computer mouse resulted in better performance and lower mental workload. This may either be due to higher user familiarity with computer mouse interaction or to limitations of the gaze control equipment and insufficient adjustments of the interface design to optimize for gaze control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. 201-210 p.
Series
Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, E-ISSN 2333-4959
Keyword [en]
human factors, aviation, gaze control
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141022OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-141022DiVA: diva2:1143062
Conference
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe Chapter 2016 Annual Conference, Prague, Czech Republic, October 26-28, 2016
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2017-09-29Bibliographically approved

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Alfredson, JensPrytz, Erik

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Linger, OscarHägg, VeronicaNilsson, LinnHolmqvist, ÅsaDurefors, SandraAlfredson, JensPrytz, Erik
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Linköping UniversityDepartment of Computer and Information ScienceFaculty of Arts and SciencesHuman-Centered systems
Applied Psychology

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
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Output format
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