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On the accountability of changing bodies: Using discursive psychology to examine embodied identities in different research settings
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3307-0748
2014 (English)In: Qualitative psychology journal, ISSN 2326-3598, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 144-162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

dentity is typically understood as something that individuals “have” or own, an essential part of one’s psychological state that guides how we behave and how we fit into society. By contrast, the discursive psychological (DP) approach treats identity as an ongoing, active construction that is primarily achieved through discourse and social interaction. This paper documents the DP approach to identities, focusing specifically on embodied identities, and demonstrates the potential of DP for making sense of identities and embodiment in different research settings. Data are taken from three research contexts: (a) video and audio-recorded, everyday family mealtime interactions in England and Scotland, (b) audio recordings of weight management groups within the National Health Service (NHS) in Scotland, and (c) video-recorded interviews involving people with alopecia and their use of wigs in Scotland. In each of these settings, bodies were oriented to as predominantly stable and consistent, with references to changing bodies—such as changing food preferences, changing weight or body size, and changing hair color—as marked and accountable in each interaction. This paper contributes to a growing body of research that argues that bodies are not separate from discourse, and rather than examining “body talk” and embodied identity work, can illuminate not only identity research but also the potential of discursive approaches to psychology and interaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2014. Vol. 1, no 2, p. 144-162
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141152DOI: 10.1037/qup0000012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-141152DiVA: diva2:1143933
Available from: 2017-09-23 Created: 2017-09-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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