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Adult and child use of love, like, don't like and hate during family mealtimes: Subjective category assessments as food preference talk
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3307-0748
2014 (English)In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 7-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food preference is now a ubiquitous concept in eating research, and closely associated with actual consumption, particularly in relation to children's food preferences. Research in this area is beginning to reveal the effects of parent-child interaction on eating practices though relatively little attention has been paid to the discursive and lexical processes involved. Food preferences are typically associated with the terms 'likes' and 'dislikes' in food preference research. By contrast, adults and children typically use the terms 'love', 'like', 'don't like' and 'hate' to construct and manage food preferences in everyday meal conversations. A corpus of 270 video- and audio-recorded English and Scottish family mealtimes, involving children aged 1-17 years, was searched and analysed for any and all occurrences of subjective category assessments (SCAs; e.g., 'I like X'), featuring the terms 'love', 'like', 'don't like' and 'hate'. Discursive psychology was used to analyse the transcripts and recordings, and illustrated the disparity between adult and child use of SCAs and food preference talk. Within the data set, parents typically made claims about what their children like, and in doing so claimed epistemic primacy over their children's food preferences. Children, by contrast, typically made claims about their own 'don't likes' and likes, and these were frequently countered by their parents or treated as inappropriate claims. Implications for how parents and researchers might reorient to the food preferences lexicon are discussed

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 80, no 1, p. 7-15
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141153DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2014.04.024PubMedID: 24793063OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-141153DiVA, id: diva2:1143934
Available from: 2017-09-23 Created: 2017-09-23 Last updated: 2017-10-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf