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Eugh’: Disgust markers as assessments in family mealtime interaction
School of Psychological Sciences and Health, University of Strathclyde,, University of Strathclyde, UK.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3307-0748
2011 (English)In: Abstracts from the XXIst Congress 2011 of European Chemoreception Research Organization, ECRO-2011, 7–10 September 2011, Manchester, Conference Centre, Manchester, UK, 2011, p. A10-A10Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Disgust is a theoretical as well as a sensory concept. To be disgusted, one needs to understand not only the sensory characteristics that might be perceived as disgusting, but also the ideational character- istics that mark out “good” from “bad”, “right” from “wrong”. In describing something as disgusting, one is also evaluating it in a particular way. The current paper examines exactly this process: how disgust is used to make an assessment in everyday language use. The topic is food and eating, the setting is family mealtimes. Families in England and Scotland (with English as the native language) were video and audio recorded as they ate meals in their homes. The audio and video data therefore captures naturalistic interaction: as closely as possible to how people would normally act in those settings. A discursive psychological analysis is used to examine the data. This approach focuses on talk as a social practice: the emphasis is on what is achieved socially through talking in a par- ticular way, rather than on individual cognitive processes that may underpin the talk. The analysis focused on instances where speakers uttered a “disgust marker” such as “eugh”, “yuck” or “disgusting”. The analysis demonstrates that disgust markers are typically characterised by three features: they usually follow a “noticing” about the food/eating practice (i.e. other people’s attention is drawn to the target object), they usually occur at the start of a turn in talk (i.e. turn-initial), and they are predominantly uttered alone (i.e. “eugh” ) without any explanation or clarification. These features enable disgust markers to make an assessment of food or behaviour without indicating the source of the trouble. That is, whether it is the subject (the consumer) or the object (the food) that is the source of the disgust, is not clear. Disgust markers, in their sequential and intonational detail, are thus argued to blur the subject/ object boundary. Speakers may also challenge others Õ assessments of disgust, and so one can also see the social rights to “knowing” disgust being managed in talk and interaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. p. A10-A10
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141266OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-141266DiVA, id: diva2:1145073
Conference
The XXIst Congress 2011 of European Chemoreception Research Organization, ECRO-2011, 7–10 September 2011, Manchester, Conference Centre, Manchester, UK
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved

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Wiggins, Sally

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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