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Neural inhibition can explain negative BOLD responses: A mechanistic modelling and fMRI study
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
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2017 (English)In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 158, 219-231 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of hemodynamic changes captured in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response contains information of brain activity. The BOLD response is the result of a complex neurovascular coupling and comes in at least two fundamentally different forms: a positive and a negative deflection. Because of the complexity of the signaling, mathematical modelling can provide vital help in the data analysis. For the positive BOLD response, there are plenty of mathematical models, both physiological and phenomenological. However, for the negative BOLD response, no physiologically based model exists. Here, we expand our previously developed physiological model with the most prominent mechanistic hypothesis for the negative BOLD response: the neural inhibition hypothesis. The model was trained and tested on experimental data containing both negative and positive BOLD responses from two studies: 1) a visual-motor task and 2) a workin-gmemory task in conjunction with administration of the tranquilizer diazepam. Our model was able to predict independent validation data not used for training and provides a mechanistic underpinning for previously observed effects of diazepam. The new model moves our understanding of the negative BOLD response from qualitative reasoning to a quantitative systems-biology level, which can be useful both in basic research and in clinical use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 158, 219-231 p.
Keyword [en]
fMRI; Neurovascular coupling; GABA; glutamate; Cerebral blood flow; Blood oxygen level dependent response; Hemodynamic response; Systems biology
National Category
Bioinformatics (Computational Biology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141844DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.07.002ISI: 000411450600021PubMedID: 28687518Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85022231713OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-141844DiVA: diva2:1147966
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [20146249]; Knut and Alice Wallenbergs foundation, KAW [2013.0076]; Research council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-481691]; Linkoping University local funds

Available from: 2017-10-09 Created: 2017-10-09 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Sten, SebastianLundengård, KarinWitt, Suzanne TysonCedersund, GunnarElinder, FredrikEngström, Maria
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Division of Radiological SciencesFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesCenter for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV)Division of Biomedical EngineeringFaculty of Science & EngineeringDepartment of Clinical and Experimental MedicineDivison of Neurobiology
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CiteExportLink to record
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