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Attitudes towards the use of computerized cognitive behavior therapy (cCBT) with children and adolescents: A survey among Swedish mental health professionals
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatric Research and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatric Research and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
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2014 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 1, no 3, 111-117 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Research has shown that computerized cognitive behavior therapy (cCBT), including internet-delivered CBT), can be effective. However, less is known about clinicians' attitudes towards this mode of treatment delivery. The aim of this study was to explore the attitudes of clinicians within child- and adolescent psychiatry towards cCBT and to explore if attitudes differed depending on rurality or theoretical orientation.

Methods

A random sample of Swedish child- and adolescent mental health services was selected for a survey study (N = 15). A total number of 156 surveys were collected.

Results

Results showed a generally low knowledge of cCBT. A majority of clinicians were positive to cCBT as a prevention program (73%), and as treatment for mild to moderate problems (75%). More caution was reported with regard to more severe mental health problems. Treatment orientation, but not rurality, had a significant effect on several ratings. Thematic analyses showed concerns regarding for example lack of human support and the restricted usefulness of cCBT regarding age and complexity of symptoms. Perceived advantages were for example increased availability and possibility of an alternative way of communication.

Conclusions

This study adds to the limited literature on attitudes towards cCBT. The emerging picture is of a mainly positive attitude and prerequisites for dissemination are promising.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014. Vol. 1, no 3, 111-117 p.
Keyword [en]
Internet-delivered CBT, Computerized CBT, Children, Adolescents, Attitudes
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142211DOI: 10.1016/j.invent.2014.06.002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84950306673OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-142211DiVA: diva2:1151454
Available from: 2017-10-23 Created: 2017-10-23 Last updated: 2017-11-01Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, Gerhard

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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More styles
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  • de-DE
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  • sv-SE
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Output format
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