liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Intranasal oxytocin and a polymorphism in the oxytocin receptor gene are associated with human-directed social behavior in golden retriever dogs
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (AVIAN Behaviour Genomics and Physiology Group)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6115-7517
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (AVIAN Behaviour Genomics and Physiology Group)
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (AVIAN Behaviour Genomics and Physiology Group)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5508-4465
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (AVIAN Behaviour Genomics and Physiology Group)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3297-1130
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Hormones and Behavior, ISSN 0018-506X, E-ISSN 1095-6867, Vol. 95, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The oxytocin system may play an important role in dog domestication from the wolf. Dogs have evolved unique human analogue social skills enabling them to communicate and cooperate efficiently with people. Genomic differences in the region surrounding the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene have previously been associated with variation in doge communicative skills. Here we have utilized the unsolvable problem paradigm to investigate the effects of oxytocin and OXTR polymorphisms on human-directed contact seeking behavior in 60 golden retriever dogs. Human-oriented behavior was quantified employing a previously defined unsolvable problem paradigm. Behaviors were tested twice in a repeated, counterbalanced design, where dogs received a nasal dose of either oxytocin or saline 45 min before each test occasion. Buccal DNA was analysed for genotype on three previously identified SNP-markers associated with OXTR. The same polymorphisms were also geno-typed in 21 wolf blood samples to explore potential genomic differences between the species. Results showed that oxytocin treatment decreased physical contact seeking with the experimenter and one of the three polymorphisms was associated with degree of physical contact seeking with the owner. Dogs with the AA-genotype at this locus increased owner physical contact seeking in response to oxytocin while the opposite effect was found in GG-genotype individuals. Hence, intranasal oxytocin treatment, an OXTR polymorphism and their interaction are associated with doge human-directed social skills, which can explain previously described breed differences in oxytocin response. Genotypic variation at the studied locus was also found in wolves indicating that it was present even at the start of dog domestication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE , 2017. Vol. 95, p. 85-93
Keywords [en]
Oxytocin; Oxytocin receptor gene; OXTR; Domestic dog; Canine; Wolf; Canis lupus; Behavior genetics; Canine behavior; Social behavior
National Category
Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142438DOI: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2017.07.016ISI: 000412863500010PubMedID: 28765081OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-142438DiVA, id: diva2:1153651
Note

Funding Agencies|European Research Council (ERC) [322206]

Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2018-03-28

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1372 kB)2 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1372 kBChecksum SHA-512
a9758b475bce577eb55e6511cf41ca77c03692a64d9d74aee212a5cb989e4106bdd53f97c5d20aaec7400312de4b7c6450e6cb01d608fa04c7e1b90e93d4e7c1
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Persson, MiaBélteky, JohanRoth, LinaJensen, Per
By organisation
BiologyFaculty of Science & Engineering
In the same journal
Hormones and Behavior
Other Biological Topics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 2 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 191 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf